skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Applications of laser annealing and laser-induced diffusion to photovoltaic conversion

Abstract

Over the past several years it has been demonstrated that a variety of techniques involving pulsed laser irradiation of both single crystal and polycrystalline silicon by pulsed lasers can result in the reproducible achievement of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Pulsed laser annealing (PLA) after an ion implantation (II) step results in melting (for a time of order 100 nsec) and essentially defect-free liquid phase epitaxial regrowth within approx. 0.5 ..mu..m of the surface. Complete electrical activation of a number of dopant ions, at concentrations exceeding ordinary solubility limits, has been demonstrated and crystalline (polycrystalline) silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.6% (12.5%) have been obtained. Other p-n junction and solar cell fabrication techniques have been demonstrated. Pulsed laser processing has also been demonstrated to have several other unique and beneficial advantages in polycrystalline silicon substrates. For example, grain boundaries do not exist during laser melting, while dopant diffusion is taking place; the short melt durations involved further limit dopant diffusion; precipitates present after conventional high temperature dopant diffusion can be removed; and, certain types of electrically active grain boundaries can be made inactive by pulsed laser irradiation. Finally, grain growth in fine-grained polycrystalline silicon films, via pulsed laser melting andmore » recrystallization, has been demonstrated. Because little is known about the application of similar pulsed laser processing techniques to compound semiconductors, particularly in connection with the formation of shallow p-n junctions, research has been devoted to studies of pulsed laser processing of GaAs and compound semiconductor solar cell fabrication techniques that are compatible with the use of pulsed lasers. Progress is reported. (WHK)« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6552563
Report Number(s):
CONF-810349-1
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: High efficiency concentrator and III-V compound contractors in depth review meeting, Raleigh, NC, USA, 31 Mar 1981
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; GALLIUM ARSENIDE SOLAR CELLS; FABRICATION; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; ANNEALING; CRYSTAL DOPING; AMORPHOUS STATE; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; DIFFUSION; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRIC CONTACTS; EPITAXY; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; ION IMPLANTATION; LASER-RADIATION HEATING; MONOCRYSTALS; POLYCRYSTALS; RECRYSTALLIZATION; SILICON; SILICON SOLAR CELLS; SOLAR CELLS; ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ARSENIDES; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALS; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; ELEMENTS; EQUIPMENT; GALLIUM COMPOUNDS; HEAT TREATMENTS; HEATING; MICROSTRUCTURE; PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS; PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS; PLASMA HEATING; PNICTIDES; SEMIMETALS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; 140501* - Solar Energy Conversion- Photovoltaic Conversion; 360601 - Other Materials- Preparation & Manufacture

Citation Formats

Lowndes, D H, Young, R T, and Wood, R F. Applications of laser annealing and laser-induced diffusion to photovoltaic conversion. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Lowndes, D H, Young, R T, & Wood, R F. Applications of laser annealing and laser-induced diffusion to photovoltaic conversion. United States.
Lowndes, D H, Young, R T, and Wood, R F. 1981. "Applications of laser annealing and laser-induced diffusion to photovoltaic conversion". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6552563.
@article{osti_6552563,
title = {Applications of laser annealing and laser-induced diffusion to photovoltaic conversion},
author = {Lowndes, D H and Young, R T and Wood, R F},
abstractNote = {Over the past several years it has been demonstrated that a variety of techniques involving pulsed laser irradiation of both single crystal and polycrystalline silicon by pulsed lasers can result in the reproducible achievement of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Pulsed laser annealing (PLA) after an ion implantation (II) step results in melting (for a time of order 100 nsec) and essentially defect-free liquid phase epitaxial regrowth within approx. 0.5 ..mu..m of the surface. Complete electrical activation of a number of dopant ions, at concentrations exceeding ordinary solubility limits, has been demonstrated and crystalline (polycrystalline) silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.6% (12.5%) have been obtained. Other p-n junction and solar cell fabrication techniques have been demonstrated. Pulsed laser processing has also been demonstrated to have several other unique and beneficial advantages in polycrystalline silicon substrates. For example, grain boundaries do not exist during laser melting, while dopant diffusion is taking place; the short melt durations involved further limit dopant diffusion; precipitates present after conventional high temperature dopant diffusion can be removed; and, certain types of electrically active grain boundaries can be made inactive by pulsed laser irradiation. Finally, grain growth in fine-grained polycrystalline silicon films, via pulsed laser melting and recrystallization, has been demonstrated. Because little is known about the application of similar pulsed laser processing techniques to compound semiconductors, particularly in connection with the formation of shallow p-n junctions, research has been devoted to studies of pulsed laser processing of GaAs and compound semiconductor solar cell fabrication techniques that are compatible with the use of pulsed lasers. Progress is reported. (WHK)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6552563}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1981},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: