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Title: Microbial conversion of coal

Abstract

The objectives of this project were to describe in detail the degradation of coals by fungi and microbes, to expand the range of applicability of the process to include new microbes and other coal types, to identify the means by which biosolubilization of coal is accomplished, and to explore means to enhance the rates and extent of coal bioconversion. The project was initiated in a response to the discovery by Dr. Martin Cohen at the University of Hartford, of a fungal strain of Coriolus versicolor that would render a solid coal substance, leonardite, into a liquid product. The project has identified the principal agent of leonardite solubilization as a powerful metal chelator, most likely a fungal-produced siderophore. Another nonlaccase enzyme has also been identified as a unique biosolubilizing agent produced by C. versicolor. Assays were developed for the quantitative determination of biological coal conversion, and for the determination of potency of biosolubilizing agent. Screening studies uncovered several microbial organisms capable of coal biodegradation, and led to the discovery that prolonged heating in air at the moderate temperature of 150{degree}C allowed the biodegradation of Illinois {number sign}6 coal to material soluble in dilute base. Chemical studies showed that leonardite biosolubilization wasmore » accompanied by relatively small change in composition, while solubilization of Illinois {number sign}6 coal involves considerable oxidation of the coal. 24 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA); Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/FE
OSTI Identifier:
6540220
Report Number(s):
EPRI-GS-6553
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; COAL; BIOCONVERSION; BIODEGRADATION; COAL LIQUIDS; ENZYMES; FUNGI; MICROORGANISMS; PROGRESS REPORT; SCREENING; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; LIQUIDS; MATERIALS; PLANTS; 010405* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Hydrogenation & Liquefaction; 550700 - Microbiology

Citation Formats

Bean, R.M. Microbial conversion of coal. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Bean, R.M. Microbial conversion of coal. United States.
Bean, R.M. Sun . "Microbial conversion of coal". United States.
@article{osti_6540220,
title = {Microbial conversion of coal},
author = {Bean, R.M.},
abstractNote = {The objectives of this project were to describe in detail the degradation of coals by fungi and microbes, to expand the range of applicability of the process to include new microbes and other coal types, to identify the means by which biosolubilization of coal is accomplished, and to explore means to enhance the rates and extent of coal bioconversion. The project was initiated in a response to the discovery by Dr. Martin Cohen at the University of Hartford, of a fungal strain of Coriolus versicolor that would render a solid coal substance, leonardite, into a liquid product. The project has identified the principal agent of leonardite solubilization as a powerful metal chelator, most likely a fungal-produced siderophore. Another nonlaccase enzyme has also been identified as a unique biosolubilizing agent produced by C. versicolor. Assays were developed for the quantitative determination of biological coal conversion, and for the determination of potency of biosolubilizing agent. Screening studies uncovered several microbial organisms capable of coal biodegradation, and led to the discovery that prolonged heating in air at the moderate temperature of 150{degree}C allowed the biodegradation of Illinois {number sign}6 coal to material soluble in dilute base. Chemical studies showed that leonardite biosolubilization was accompanied by relatively small change in composition, while solubilization of Illinois {number sign}6 coal involves considerable oxidation of the coal. 24 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {10}
}

Technical Report:
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