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Title: Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report

Abstract

Three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars support missions were investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: A Solar Radiation Absorption (SRA) system, a Solar-Pumped Laser (SPL) system and a solar powered magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sunsynchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The MPD system used indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary propulsion system boosts the payload into a Hohmann transfer to Mars. The SPL spacecraft and the SPL powered spacecraft return to Earth for subsequent missions. The MPD propelled spacecraft, however, remains at Mars as an orbiting space station. A patched conic approximation was used to determine a heliocentric interplanetary transfer orbit for the MPDmore » propelled spacecraft. All three solar-powered spacecraft use an aerobrake procedure to place the payload into a low Mars parking orbit. The payload delivery times range from 160 days to 873 days (2.39 years).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6533270
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6533270
Report Number(s):
N-90-25164; NASA-CR--186218; NAS--1.26:186218
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DESIGN; SPACE VEHICLES; CARBON DIOXIDE LASERS; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; OPTICAL PUMPING; ORBITS; PROGRESS REPORT; RADIATION ABSORPTION ANALYSIS; SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR RADIATION; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUID MECHANICS; GAS LASERS; HYDRODYNAMICS; LASERS; MECHANICS; NONDESTRUCTIVE ANALYSIS; PUMPING; RADIATIONS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; STELLAR RADIATION; VEHICLES 140000* -- Solar Energy

Citation Formats

Auziasdeturenne, J., Beall, M., Burianek, J., Cinniger, A., Dunmire, B., Haberman, E., Iwamoto, J., Johnson, S., Mccracken, S., and Miller, M. Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Auziasdeturenne, J., Beall, M., Burianek, J., Cinniger, A., Dunmire, B., Haberman, E., Iwamoto, J., Johnson, S., Mccracken, S., & Miller, M. Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report. United States.
Auziasdeturenne, J., Beall, M., Burianek, J., Cinniger, A., Dunmire, B., Haberman, E., Iwamoto, J., Johnson, S., Mccracken, S., and Miller, M. Thu . "Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report". United States.
@article{osti_6533270,
title = {Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report},
author = {Auziasdeturenne, J. and Beall, M. and Burianek, J. and Cinniger, A. and Dunmire, B. and Haberman, E. and Iwamoto, J. and Johnson, S. and Mccracken, S. and Miller, M.},
abstractNote = {Three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars support missions were investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: A Solar Radiation Absorption (SRA) system, a Solar-Pumped Laser (SPL) system and a solar powered magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sunsynchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The MPD system used indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary propulsion system boosts the payload into a Hohmann transfer to Mars. The SPL spacecraft and the SPL powered spacecraft return to Earth for subsequent missions. The MPD propelled spacecraft, however, remains at Mars as an orbiting space station. A patched conic approximation was used to determine a heliocentric interplanetary transfer orbit for the MPD propelled spacecraft. All three solar-powered spacecraft use an aerobrake procedure to place the payload into a low Mars parking orbit. The payload delivery times range from 160 days to 873 days (2.39 years).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {6}
}

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