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Title: Radiation effects in optical emitters and receivers

Abstract

In some applications optoelectronic devices must function in a radiation environment which requires knowledge of the manner and extent of expected device degradation upon exposure to radiation. An up-to-date summary of radiation damage studies on the emitter and detector components of optoelectronic systems: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, semiconductor detectors, and optical isolators. Some conclusions drawn from this work are: (1) Amphoterically Si doped GaAs LEDs are extremely sensitive to irradiation and should be avoided except in those applications where the fluence and/or dose levels are low and changes in emitter output can be tolerated. (2) The most important pre-irradiation parameters for judging LED radiation degradation are the minority carrier lifetime, tau/sub 0/, and the output power P/sub 0/. By controlling tau/sub 0/ with radiative recombination processes one can minimize the radiation sensitivity and, at the same time, maintain large P/sub 0/ values. (3) Laser diodes when operated well into lasing conditions are insensitive to irradiation and therefore attractive for radiation environment applications. (4) Detectors which depend on diffusion-limited collection of carriers for photocurrent generation are sensitive to irradiation and should be avoided. (5) Recent data shows that certain actively biased avalanche photodiodes do not catastrophically fail during ionization pulsesmore » as large as 1 x 10/sup 10/ rads/sec, and therefore, these devices should be considered for radiation applications. (6) For future systems operating at wavelengths greater than 1.0 ..mu..m, III--V compound detectors with thin active regions are more attractive than Si detectors. (7) Finally, many commercial optical isolators are made up of amphoterically Si doped GaAs LEDs and phototransistors. Since both of these devices are radiation sensitive, such isolators are not suitable for radiation environments.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6512188
Report Number(s):
SAND-78-1798C; CONF-780923-2
TRN: 79-005659
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-76-C-04-0789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fiber optics and communications exposition, Chicago, IL, USA, 6 Sep 1978
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; LIGHT EMITTING DIODES; RADIATION EFFECTS; PHOTODETECTORS; PHOTODIODES; SEMICONDUCTOR LASERS; DAMAGE; PERFORMANCE; LASERS; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES; 440200* - Radiation Effects on Instrument Components, Instruments, or Electronic Systems

Citation Formats

Barnes, C E, and Mitchell, K W. Radiation effects in optical emitters and receivers. United States: N. p., 1978. Web.
Barnes, C E, & Mitchell, K W. Radiation effects in optical emitters and receivers. United States.
Barnes, C E, and Mitchell, K W. Sun . "Radiation effects in optical emitters and receivers". United States.
@article{osti_6512188,
title = {Radiation effects in optical emitters and receivers},
author = {Barnes, C E and Mitchell, K W},
abstractNote = {In some applications optoelectronic devices must function in a radiation environment which requires knowledge of the manner and extent of expected device degradation upon exposure to radiation. An up-to-date summary of radiation damage studies on the emitter and detector components of optoelectronic systems: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, semiconductor detectors, and optical isolators. Some conclusions drawn from this work are: (1) Amphoterically Si doped GaAs LEDs are extremely sensitive to irradiation and should be avoided except in those applications where the fluence and/or dose levels are low and changes in emitter output can be tolerated. (2) The most important pre-irradiation parameters for judging LED radiation degradation are the minority carrier lifetime, tau/sub 0/, and the output power P/sub 0/. By controlling tau/sub 0/ with radiative recombination processes one can minimize the radiation sensitivity and, at the same time, maintain large P/sub 0/ values. (3) Laser diodes when operated well into lasing conditions are insensitive to irradiation and therefore attractive for radiation environment applications. (4) Detectors which depend on diffusion-limited collection of carriers for photocurrent generation are sensitive to irradiation and should be avoided. (5) Recent data shows that certain actively biased avalanche photodiodes do not catastrophically fail during ionization pulses as large as 1 x 10/sup 10/ rads/sec, and therefore, these devices should be considered for radiation applications. (6) For future systems operating at wavelengths greater than 1.0 ..mu..m, III--V compound detectors with thin active regions are more attractive than Si detectors. (7) Finally, many commercial optical isolators are made up of amphoterically Si doped GaAs LEDs and phototransistors. Since both of these devices are radiation sensitive, such isolators are not suitable for radiation environments.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1978},
month = {1}
}

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