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Title: Energy savings through improved tractive efficiency

Abstract

The fuel consumption of farm tractors for 1980 is estimated to be 5.0 billion gallons. Assuming that 75 percent of this amount is used for drawbar or draft loads, then 3.75 billion gallons of fuel energy will be passed through tractive devices, mostly rubber tires, this year. The average tractive efficiency for tractors operating under drawbar or draft loads is estimated to be 46 percent. Each 1-percent increase will bring savings of approximately 75 to 80 million gallons of fuel annually to United States farmers. Tractive efficiency can be increased in several ways. Research has shown that the shape of the ground contact area, or footprint, of a tractive device is important. A footprint that is long and narrow in the direction of travel compacts less of the total soil surface area than one that is short and wide, thereby reducing rolling losses. The front portion of the device establishes a firm travel path for much of the rest of the device, resulting in improved traction. The length/width ratio of tractive devices may be increased by using tracks, tandem drive wheels, large-diameter tires, or radial ply tires.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dept. of Agriculture, Auburn, AL
OSTI Identifier:
6510862
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6510862
Report Number(s):
CONF-8009144-(Vol.2)
Journal ID: CODEN: ASPUD
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ASAE Publ.; (United States); Journal Volume: 4-81; Conference: ASAE national energy symposium, Kansas City, MO, USA, 29 Sep 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FARM EQUIPMENT; FUEL CONSUMPTION; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; VEHICLES; WHEELS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; EQUIPMENT 320303* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Equipment & Processes

Citation Formats

Taylor, J.H.. Energy savings through improved tractive efficiency. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Taylor, J.H.. Energy savings through improved tractive efficiency. United States.
Taylor, J.H.. Thu . "Energy savings through improved tractive efficiency". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6510862,
title = {Energy savings through improved tractive efficiency},
author = {Taylor, J.H.},
abstractNote = {The fuel consumption of farm tractors for 1980 is estimated to be 5.0 billion gallons. Assuming that 75 percent of this amount is used for drawbar or draft loads, then 3.75 billion gallons of fuel energy will be passed through tractive devices, mostly rubber tires, this year. The average tractive efficiency for tractors operating under drawbar or draft loads is estimated to be 46 percent. Each 1-percent increase will bring savings of approximately 75 to 80 million gallons of fuel annually to United States farmers. Tractive efficiency can be increased in several ways. Research has shown that the shape of the ground contact area, or footprint, of a tractive device is important. A footprint that is long and narrow in the direction of travel compacts less of the total soil surface area than one that is short and wide, thereby reducing rolling losses. The front portion of the device establishes a firm travel path for much of the rest of the device, resulting in improved traction. The length/width ratio of tractive devices may be increased by using tracks, tandem drive wheels, large-diameter tires, or radial ply tires.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASAE Publ.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4-81,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981}
}

Conference:
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