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Title: Offshore outlook: the American Arctic

Abstract

Offshore areas in the American Arctic are highlighted and the development of the area is compared with other offshore areas where the required technology is more readily available. Principal areas are shown in which new concepts are being put to practice. Canada's east coast is examined. Several technological trends are reviewed to help operators accelerate the discovery and development of arctic petroleum reserves.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX
OSTI Identifier:
6505591
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Mech. Eng.; (United States); Journal Volume: 107:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; ARCTIC REGIONS; OFFSHORE OPERATIONS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; COASTAL WATERS; EXPLORATION; ICEBERGS; IMPACT STRENGTH; NORTH AMERICA; OFFSHORE DRILLING; OFFSHORE PLATFORMS; DRILLING; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; ICE; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; MINERAL RESOURCES; POLAR REGIONS; RESOURCES; SURFACE WATERS 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Jahns, M.O. Offshore outlook: the American Arctic. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Jahns, M.O. Offshore outlook: the American Arctic. United States.
Jahns, M.O. 1985. "Offshore outlook: the American Arctic". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6505591,
title = {Offshore outlook: the American Arctic},
author = {Jahns, M.O.},
abstractNote = {Offshore areas in the American Arctic are highlighted and the development of the area is compared with other offshore areas where the required technology is more readily available. Principal areas are shown in which new concepts are being put to practice. Canada's east coast is examined. Several technological trends are reviewed to help operators accelerate the discovery and development of arctic petroleum reserves.},
doi = {},
journal = {Mech. Eng.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 107:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 5
}
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  • The above panel of geophysical contractors was assembled to discuss their industry's future. Conroy, in commenting on matching capacity and demand, said ''decisions as to what will happen tomorrow, next month, or next year in many cases are heavily influenced by constantly changing government regulation and emphasis, both domestically and internationally. Classic examples are offshore lease sale schedules in the U.S., changing regulations pertaining to the oil companies operating in the North Sea, Far East, and to some extent in Latin America. Forces within the U.S. government and Congress threatening to restructure the oil industry create significant uncertainties for themore » industry.'' Laws noted that in Indonesia 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years ago, there were 26 land seismic crews working and now only 6--the result of a government-structured oil company dictating exploration policy. Conroy observed that in Peru the initial round of exploration proved discouraging, the 23 crews being reduced to 2 in twelve months. Savit said ''many governments do not feel obligated to fulfill contractual terms, particularly with oil companies. Outside of the U.S., many governments assume a role of total sovereignty.'' Frasher said ''the erratic scheduling of lease sales in Federal waters is an extremely critical matter for offshore seismic contractors to know exactly when these sales are to be scheduled so a time framework can be established for the investment of additional funds. Rapidly changing technology demands that contractors constantly upgrade their array of equipment and instrumentation. Achieving this while trying to outguess governments is quite difficult.'' Dealing with environmental guidelines and operations in the Arctic is discussed. (MCW)« less
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