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Title: Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat

Abstract

Heat pump systems for recovering waste heat are considered. To compare different cycles on a consistent basis, a definition of performance based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics is presented. A high-grade heat-actuated cycle that uses a steam ejector is analyzed, but no substantial development effort is anticipated for implementing heat pumps of this type. Three residual-heat-actuated-heat pumps are analyzed. A turbine-compressor heat pump is presented that can attain relatively high delivery temperatures (approximately 120 to 130/sup 0/C from a source at 60/sup 0/C. The other two residual-heat-actuated concepts presented are absorption heat pumps. One operates on a closed cycle and the other on an open cycle. Delivery temperatures on the order of 115 10 130/sup 0/C with a 60/sup 0/C source are possible, provided that advanced heat/mass transfer configurations are developed. The open-cycle concept is an interesting possibility for heat recovery. It can, in principle, operate with lower waste heat temperatures than a closed cycle, and during the heating season it may provide both process and space heat.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6505304
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-7655
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HEAT PUMPS; EFFICIENCY; THERMODYNAMIC CYCLES; WASTE HEAT UTILIZATION; INDUSTRY; WASTE HEAT; CLOSED-CYCLE SYSTEMS; HEAT RECOVERY; OPEN-CYCLE SYSTEMS; PERFORMANCE; ENERGY; ENERGY RECOVERY; HEAT; RECOVERY; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; WASTES; 320304* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Industrial & Agricultural Processes- Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization; 290800 - Energy Planning & Policy- Heat Utilization- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Blanco, H.P. Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Blanco, H.P. Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat. United States.
Blanco, H.P. 1981. "Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6505304,
title = {Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat},
author = {Blanco, H.P.},
abstractNote = {Heat pump systems for recovering waste heat are considered. To compare different cycles on a consistent basis, a definition of performance based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics is presented. A high-grade heat-actuated cycle that uses a steam ejector is analyzed, but no substantial development effort is anticipated for implementing heat pumps of this type. Three residual-heat-actuated-heat pumps are analyzed. A turbine-compressor heat pump is presented that can attain relatively high delivery temperatures (approximately 120 to 130/sup 0/C from a source at 60/sup 0/C. The other two residual-heat-actuated concepts presented are absorption heat pumps. One operates on a closed cycle and the other on an open cycle. Delivery temperatures on the order of 115 10 130/sup 0/C with a 60/sup 0/C source are possible, provided that advanced heat/mass transfer configurations are developed. The open-cycle concept is an interesting possibility for heat recovery. It can, in principle, operate with lower waste heat temperatures than a closed cycle, and during the heating season it may provide both process and space heat.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:
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