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Title: Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot

Abstract

The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an experimental robot, the HERMIES, to test artificial intelligence concepts. This paper describes the capabilities provided for navigation and control. The authors conclude that the sensor suite, which enables the robot to recognize, locate, and grasp objects, makes HERMIES IIB a powerful tool for robotics and artificial intelligence research. 7 refs., 11 figs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6504192
Report Number(s):
CONF-890304-11
ON: DE89003180
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3. topical meeting on robotics and remote systems, Charleston, SC, United States, 13 Mar 1989; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ROBOTS; NAVIGATION; ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE; COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE; HYPERCUBE COMPUTERS; IMAGE PROCESSING; MANIPULATORS; COMPUTERS; EQUIPMENT; LABORATORY EQUIPMENT; MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT; PROCESSING; REMOTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT; 420200* - Engineering- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques; 990210 - Supercomputers- (1987-1989)

Citation Formats

Killough, S.M., and Hamel, W.R.. Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Killough, S.M., & Hamel, W.R.. Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot. United States.
Killough, S.M., and Hamel, W.R.. 1988. "Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6504192,
title = {Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot},
author = {Killough, S.M. and Hamel, W.R.},
abstractNote = {The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an experimental robot, the HERMIES, to test artificial intelligence concepts. This paper describes the capabilities provided for navigation and control. The authors conclude that the sensor suite, which enables the robot to recognize, locate, and grasp objects, makes HERMIES IIB a powerful tool for robotics and artificial intelligence research. 7 refs., 11 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • This paper reports on the status and future directions in the research, development and experimental validation of intelligent control techniques for autonomous mobile robots using the HERMIES-III robot at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced research (CESAR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). HERMIES-III is the fourth robot in a series of increasingly more sophisticated and capable experimental test beds developed at CESAR. HERMIES-III is comprised of a battery powered, onmi-directional wheeled platform with a seven degree-of-freedom manipulator arm, video cameras, sonar range sensors, laser imaging scanner and a dual computer system containing up to 128 NCUBE nodes in hypercubemore » configuration. All electronics, sensors, computers, and communication equipment required for autonomous operation of HERMIES-III are located on board along with sufficient battery power for three to four hours of operation. The paper first provides a more detailed description of the HERMIES-III characteristics, focussing on the new areas of research and demonstration now possible at CESAR with this new test-bed. The initial experimental program is then described with emphasis placed on autonomous performance of human-scale tasks (e.g., valve manipulation, use of tools), integration of a dexterous manipulator and platform motion in geometrically complex environments, and effective use of multiple cooperating robots (HERMIES-IIB and HERMIES- III). The paper concludes with a discussion of the integration problems and safety considerations necessarily arising from the set-up of an experimental program involving human-scale, multi-autonomous mobile robots performance. 10 refs., 3 figs.« less
  • In recent years robot navigation has attracted much attention from researchers around the world. Not only are theoretical studies being simulated on sophisticated computers, but many mobile robots are now used as test vehicles for these theoretical studies. Various algorithms have been perfected for navigation in a known static environment; but navigation in an unknown and dynamic environment poses a much more challenging problem for researchers. Many different methodologies have been developed for autonomous robot navigation, but each methodology is usually restricted to a particular type of environment. One important research focus of the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced researchmore » (CESAR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is autonomous navigation in unknown and dynamic environments using the series of HERMIES mobile robots. The research uses an expert system for high-level planning interfaced with C-coded routines for implementing the plans, and for quick processing of data requested by the expert system. In using this approach, the navigation is not restricted to one methodology since the expert system can activate a rule module for the methodology best suited for the current situation. Rule modules can be added the rule base as they are developed and tested. Modules are being developed or enhanced for navigating from a map, searching for a target, exploring, artificial potential-field navigation, navigation using edge-detection, etc. This paper will report on the various rule modules and methods of navigation in use, or under development at CESAR, using the HERMIES-IIB robot as a testbed. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • In this paper, advances to our mobile robot series (currently HERMIES-IIB) to include 8 NCUBE processors on-board, (computationally equivalent to 8 Vax 11/780's) operating in parallel, and augmentation of the sensor suite with cameras to facilitate on-board vision analysis and goal finding are described. The essential capabilities of the expert system described in earlier papers have been ported to the on-board HERMIES-IIB computers thereby eliminating off-board computation. A successful experiment is described in which a robot is placed in an initial arbitrary location without prior specification of the room contents, successfully discovers and navigates around stationary and moving obstacles, picksmore » up and moves small obstacles, searches for a control panel, and reads the meters found on the panel. 19 refs., 5 figs.« less
  • The purpose of this paper is to report the current status of investigations ongoing at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) in the areas of navigation and manipulation in unstructured environments. The HERMIES-I mobile robot, a prototype of a series which contains many of the major features needed for remote work in hazardous environments is discussed. Initial experimental work at CESAR has begun in the area of navigation. It briefly reviews some of the ongoing research in autonomous navigation and describes initial research with HERMIES-I and associated graphic simulation. Since the HERMIES robots will generally be composed ofmore » a variety of asynchronously controlled hardware components (such as manipulator arms, digital image sensors, sonars, etc.) it seems appropriate to consider future development of the HERMIES brain as a hypercube ensemble machine with concurrent computation and associated message passing. The basic properties of such a hypercube architecture are presented. Decision-making under uncertainty eventually permeates all of our work. Following a survey of existing analytical approaches, it was decided that a stronger theoretical basis is required. As such, this paper presents the framework for a recently developed hybrid uncertainty theory. 21 refs., 2 figs.« less
  • We have designed, built, and tested a new wheel control system for the HERMIES-III robot. HERMIES-III is a large mobile robot with omnidirectional steering that is designed for human scale experiments. The wheel control system moves the robot toward a goal and calculates the current position of the robot. The system has seven modes for moving to a goal and allows the goal to be changed (at 20 Hz) during motion by the robot.