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Title: Nitrous oxide emissions from cropped fields

Abstract

From mid-May to mid-September 1978, nitrous oxide (N/sub 2/O) emissions from an irrigated corn (Zea mays L.) field in northern Colorado totaled only 2.5 kg N ha/sup -1/, and even smaller losses were measured from a nearby sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) field. Fluxes measured by a simple soil cover method compared favorably with micrometeorological estimates of vertical N/sub 2/O flux density. About 30% of the N/sub 2/O lost from the corn field was emitted during the 2 weeks following fertilization while NH/sub 3/ was being rapidly nitrified, and 59% was evolved during the week following the field's first irrigation, when restricted oxygen diffusion favored denitrification. Other occurrences of irrigation or precipitation exceeding 0.7 cm were also followed by rapid, though much smaller, increases in N/sub 2/O emissions. The flux of N/sub 2/O was not significantly correlated with soil nitrate concentration but was strongly correlated with soil water content and N/sub 2/O concentration in the soil atmosphere, which always exceeded the ambient atmospheric concentration. We found no evidence that either site ever behaved as a sink for tropspheric N/sub 2/O. Total N/sub 2/O emissions from the corn field amounted to only 1.3% of the 200 kg NH/sub 3/-N ha/sup -1/ appliedmore » to the crop, a much smaller fraction than has been used in models predicting the effect of agricultural fertilizers upon stratospheric ozone depletion.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA, Fort Collins, CO
OSTI Identifier:
6500441
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Environ. Qual.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; MAIZE; NITROGEN FIXATION; NITROUS OXIDE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; AIR POLLUTION; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; CROPS; DENITRIFICATION; FERTILIZERS; IRRIGATION; OZONE LAYER; STRATOSPHERE; CEREALS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; GRAMINEAE; GRASS; INDUSTRY; LAYERS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; POLLUTION; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 553000 - Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Mosier, A R, and Hutchinson, G L. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropped fields. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.2134/jeq1981.00472425001000020009x.
Mosier, A R, & Hutchinson, G L. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropped fields. United States. doi:10.2134/jeq1981.00472425001000020009x.
Mosier, A R, and Hutchinson, G L. Wed . "Nitrous oxide emissions from cropped fields". United States. doi:10.2134/jeq1981.00472425001000020009x.
@article{osti_6500441,
title = {Nitrous oxide emissions from cropped fields},
author = {Mosier, A R and Hutchinson, G L},
abstractNote = {From mid-May to mid-September 1978, nitrous oxide (N/sub 2/O) emissions from an irrigated corn (Zea mays L.) field in northern Colorado totaled only 2.5 kg N ha/sup -1/, and even smaller losses were measured from a nearby sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) field. Fluxes measured by a simple soil cover method compared favorably with micrometeorological estimates of vertical N/sub 2/O flux density. About 30% of the N/sub 2/O lost from the corn field was emitted during the 2 weeks following fertilization while NH/sub 3/ was being rapidly nitrified, and 59% was evolved during the week following the field's first irrigation, when restricted oxygen diffusion favored denitrification. Other occurrences of irrigation or precipitation exceeding 0.7 cm were also followed by rapid, though much smaller, increases in N/sub 2/O emissions. The flux of N/sub 2/O was not significantly correlated with soil nitrate concentration but was strongly correlated with soil water content and N/sub 2/O concentration in the soil atmosphere, which always exceeded the ambient atmospheric concentration. We found no evidence that either site ever behaved as a sink for tropspheric N/sub 2/O. Total N/sub 2/O emissions from the corn field amounted to only 1.3% of the 200 kg NH/sub 3/-N ha/sup -1/ applied to the crop, a much smaller fraction than has been used in models predicting the effect of agricultural fertilizers upon stratospheric ozone depletion.},
doi = {10.2134/jeq1981.00472425001000020009x},
journal = {J. Environ. Qual.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 10:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1981},
month = {4}
}