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Title: Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris

Abstract

Experiments were performed to determine some of the chemical and physiological changes accompanying exposure of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Topcrop') to saline aerosol. Plants were exposed to various dosages of salt (0-150 ..mu..g Cl/sup -//cm/sup 2/) when the primary leaves were approximately one-quarter expanded (7-8 days old). Respiration, photosynthesis, and transpiration rates were determined after salt exposure. There was an increase in the respiration rate of salted plants as compared to the unsalted controls. Photosynthesis rate increased when expressed on a unit chlorophyll basis. Transpiration rate decreased with exposure to saline aerosol. When the primary leaves were fully expanded (15-17 days old) they were analyzed for contents of chloride, water, total nitrogen, total chlorophyll, total free amino acids, soluble sugar, and starch. The chloride content increased linearly with increased exposure. As the chloride content increased, the total nitrogen content decreased. Chlorophyll and amino acid contents increased until symptoms appeared, then they decreased. With increased exposure to salt total soluble sugar content increased.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ
OSTI Identifier:
6499400
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phytopathology; (United States); Journal Volume: 70:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; PHASEOLUS; METABOLISM; SALTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CORRELATIONS; AEROSOLS; BEANS; VARIATIONS; COLLOIDS; DISPERSIONS; FOOD; LEGUMINOSAE; PLANTS; SOLS; VEGETABLES; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Petolino, J.F., and Leone, I.A. Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1094/Phyto-70-229.
Petolino, J.F., & Leone, I.A. Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris. United States. doi:10.1094/Phyto-70-229.
Petolino, J.F., and Leone, I.A. 1980. "Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris". United States. doi:10.1094/Phyto-70-229.
@article{osti_6499400,
title = {Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris},
author = {Petolino, J.F. and Leone, I.A.},
abstractNote = {Experiments were performed to determine some of the chemical and physiological changes accompanying exposure of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Topcrop') to saline aerosol. Plants were exposed to various dosages of salt (0-150 ..mu..g Cl/sup -//cm/sup 2/) when the primary leaves were approximately one-quarter expanded (7-8 days old). Respiration, photosynthesis, and transpiration rates were determined after salt exposure. There was an increase in the respiration rate of salted plants as compared to the unsalted controls. Photosynthesis rate increased when expressed on a unit chlorophyll basis. Transpiration rate decreased with exposure to saline aerosol. When the primary leaves were fully expanded (15-17 days old) they were analyzed for contents of chloride, water, total nitrogen, total chlorophyll, total free amino acids, soluble sugar, and starch. The chloride content increased linearly with increased exposure. As the chloride content increased, the total nitrogen content decreased. Chlorophyll and amino acid contents increased until symptoms appeared, then they decreased. With increased exposure to salt total soluble sugar content increased.},
doi = {10.1094/Phyto-70-229},
journal = {Phytopathology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 70:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}
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