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Title: Global residential appliance standards

Abstract

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing globalmore » efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))
  2. (Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l'Energie, Valbonne (France))
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6497711
Report Number(s):
LBL-33772; CONF-9306174-2
ON: DE93015045
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: European Council for an energy-efficient economy summer study, Rungstedgaard (Denmark), 1-5 Jun 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC APPLIANCES; ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS; ELECTRIC POWER; ENERGY CONSERVATION; FREEZERS; REFRIGERATORS; CONSTRAINTS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; EVALUATED DATA; FORECASTING; GLOBAL ASPECTS; IMPLEMENTATION; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; LIFE-CYCLE COST; PERFORMANCE TESTING; PRICES; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; APPLIANCES; COOPERATION; COST; DATA; EQUIPMENT; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; POWER; STANDARDS; TESTING; 320106* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Equipment- (1987-); 291000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Conservation; 296000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power

Citation Formats

Turiel, I., McMahon, J.E., and Lebot, B. Global residential appliance standards. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Turiel, I., McMahon, J.E., & Lebot, B. Global residential appliance standards. United States.
Turiel, I., McMahon, J.E., and Lebot, B. Mon . "Global residential appliance standards". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6497711.
@article{osti_6497711,
title = {Global residential appliance standards},
author = {Turiel, I. and McMahon, J.E. and Lebot, B.},
abstractNote = {In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1993},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1993}
}

Conference:
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  • In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, themore » European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.« less
  • This paper discusses the energy savings that could be obtained in Sweden by instituting specific standards for five appliances: Refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. At the present time, Sweden has no minimum energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. This paper discusses the energy savings that could be obtained by instituting specific standards for five product types (refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, and dryers) starting in 1995. A methodology similar to that used in analyses for the European Community was employed in this study. In the Swedish study, we used appliance test data developed by the Swedish consumermore » agency, Konsument Verket, to estimate new unit energy consumption for each product type. Shipments, saturations, energy use, and demographic data were input to a spreadsheet model that sums energy consumption for each product type over the period 1990--2010. Both a base case and a standards case scenario are simulated for each of the five appliance types. It was found that electricity use for these five products can be reduced by 12% over the time period from 1990--2010. Most of the energy savings come from instituting efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. For each product class type, the impact on manufacturer offerings is discussed. For example, for simple refrigerators, eleven 1990 models meet the 1995 standard and six models meet the 2000 standard out of a total of 63 models.« less
  • This paper discusses the energy savings that could be obtained in Sweden by instituting specific standards for five appliances: Refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. At the present time, Sweden has no minimum energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. This paper discusses the energy savings that could be obtained by instituting specific standards for five product types (refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, and dryers) starting in 1995. A methodology similar to that used in analyses for the European Community was employed in this study. In the Swedish study, we used appliance test data developed by the Swedish consumermore » agency, Konsument Verket, to estimate new unit energy consumption for each product type. Shipments, saturations, energy use, and demographic data were input to a spreadsheet model that sums energy consumption for each product type over the period 1990--2010. Both a base case and a standards case scenario are simulated for each of the five appliance types. It was found that electricity use for these five products can be reduced by 12% over the time period from 1990--2010. Most of the energy savings come from instituting efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. For each product class type, the impact on manufacturer offerings is discussed. For example, for simple refrigerators, eleven 1990 models meet the 1995 standard and six models meet the 2000 standard out of a total of 63 models.« less
  • There are presently three sets of regulations which apply to the efficiency of appliances. The Appliance Efficiency Standards and Intermittent Ignition Device (IID) Standard apply to the sale of new appliances. IDD regulations also apply to distribution and installation. The Energy Conservation Standards for New Residential Buildings include two sections which refer to the installation in new residential buildings of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning equipment and water heating equipment. These regulations apply to: hotels, motels, apartment houses, lodging houses, dwellings, convents and monasteries (each accommodating more than ten persons). The Energy Conservation Standards for New Nonresidential Buildings include twomore » divisions which refer to the installation in new nonresidential buildings of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning equipment and water heat equipment. These regulations apply to all buildings except: hotels, apartment houses, dwellings, lodging houses, private garages, sheds, agricultural buildings, nurseries, hospitals, sanitariums, nursing homes, children's homes, mental hospitals, mental sanitariums, jails, prisons, and reformatories. The text of these regulations for California are given.« less