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Title: Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics

Abstract

With today's continued emphasis on environmental safety and health issues, a resurgence of interest has developed in the area of chemical sensors. These sensors would typically be used to monitor contamination hazards such as underground storage tanks or to assess previous contamination at waste disposal sites. Human exposure to chemical hazards can also be monitored. Additionally, these sensors can be used as part of a manufacturing process control loop. One type of sensor suitable for gas phase monitoring of chemicals is the quartz resonator or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor. In this type of sensor, a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator is coated with a film that interacts with the chemical species of interest. Changes in the mass and elasticity of this film are reflected as changes in the resonant properties of the device. Therefore, the presence of the species of interest can be detected by monitoring the frequency of an oscillator based on the resonance of the quartz. These QCM sensors compete with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as a means for monitoring gas phase species. SAW devices are typically more sensitive to small amounts of a species, but the instrumentation associated with a SAW device is anmore » order of magnitude more expensive than the instrumentation associated with a TSM wave resonator since the SAW devices operate in the 100's of MHz frequency regime while quartz resonators operate in the 5--25 MHz regime. We are working to improve the sensitivity of the QCM sensor by increasing the frequency of the device to 25 MHz (compared to the typical 5 MHz crystal) and by increasing the frequency stability of the system to an ultimate goal of 0.1 Hz. The 25 MHz QCM has already been achieved and once the stability goal is achieved, the QCM will have the same sensitivity as a SAW device.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6474557
Report Number(s):
SAND-92-2623C; CONF-9305110-1
ON: DE93013761
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Expo 93, Oak Ridge, TN (United States), May 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; GAS ANALYSIS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; DETECTION; QUARTZ; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; RESONATORS; DESIGN; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; MICROELECTRONICS; OSCILLATORS; THIN FILMS; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; FILMS; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; MINERALS; OXIDE MINERALS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; 440800* - Miscellaneous Instrumentation- (1990-); 400102 - Chemical & Spectral Procedures

Citation Formats

Smith, J, Sniegowski, J, Koehler, D, Ricco, T, Martin, S, and McWhorter, P. Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Smith, J, Sniegowski, J, Koehler, D, Ricco, T, Martin, S, & McWhorter, P. Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics. United States.
Smith, J, Sniegowski, J, Koehler, D, Ricco, T, Martin, S, and McWhorter, P. Wed . "Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics". United States.
@article{osti_6474557,
title = {Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics},
author = {Smith, J and Sniegowski, J and Koehler, D and Ricco, T and Martin, S and McWhorter, P},
abstractNote = {With today's continued emphasis on environmental safety and health issues, a resurgence of interest has developed in the area of chemical sensors. These sensors would typically be used to monitor contamination hazards such as underground storage tanks or to assess previous contamination at waste disposal sites. Human exposure to chemical hazards can also be monitored. Additionally, these sensors can be used as part of a manufacturing process control loop. One type of sensor suitable for gas phase monitoring of chemicals is the quartz resonator or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor. In this type of sensor, a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator is coated with a film that interacts with the chemical species of interest. Changes in the mass and elasticity of this film are reflected as changes in the resonant properties of the device. Therefore, the presence of the species of interest can be detected by monitoring the frequency of an oscillator based on the resonance of the quartz. These QCM sensors compete with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as a means for monitoring gas phase species. SAW devices are typically more sensitive to small amounts of a species, but the instrumentation associated with a SAW device is an order of magnitude more expensive than the instrumentation associated with a TSM wave resonator since the SAW devices operate in the 100's of MHz frequency regime while quartz resonators operate in the 5--25 MHz regime. We are working to improve the sensitivity of the QCM sensor by increasing the frequency of the device to 25 MHz (compared to the typical 5 MHz crystal) and by increasing the frequency stability of the system to an ultimate goal of 0.1 Hz. The 25 MHz QCM has already been achieved and once the stability goal is achieved, the QCM will have the same sensitivity as a SAW device.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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