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Title: New family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators: the compound triangular concentrator

Abstract

A new family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators is presented. The most significant characteristics of these concentrators are their small size and the fact that they use straight, as opposed to curve, reflective, or refractive interfaces. The concentrators are filled with a medium of refractive index n>1 and use narrow strips of refractive index n/sub s/

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Instituto de Energia Solar, ETSI Telecomunicacion, 28040 Madrid, Spain
OSTI Identifier:
6473519
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6473519
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Appl. Opt.; (United States); Journal Volume: 24:22
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; CONCENTRATING COLLECTORS; DESIGN; INCIDENCE ANGLE; REFRACTIVITY; TRIANGULAR CONFIGURATION; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; CONFIGURATION; EQUIPMENT; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SOLAR COLLECTORS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT 141000* -- Solar Collectors & Concentrators

Citation Formats

Min-barano, J.C. New family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators: the compound triangular concentrator. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Min-barano, J.C. New family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators: the compound triangular concentrator. United States.
Min-barano, J.C. Fri . "New family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators: the compound triangular concentrator". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6473519,
title = {New family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators: the compound triangular concentrator},
author = {Min-barano, J.C.},
abstractNote = {A new family of 2-D nonimaging concentrators is presented. The most significant characteristics of these concentrators are their small size and the fact that they use straight, as opposed to curve, reflective, or refractive interfaces. The concentrators are filled with a medium of refractive index n>1 and use narrow strips of refractive index n/sub s/},
doi = {},
journal = {Appl. Opt.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 24:22,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Fri Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}
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