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Title: Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft

Abstract

Aircraft skin thickness-loss from corrosion has been measured using dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging on a flash-heated Boeing 737 fuselage structure. The authors mapped surface temperature differences of 0.2 to 0.6 C for 5 to 14 % thickness losses within corroded lap splices at 0.4 seconds after the heat flash. The procedure mapped surface temperature differences at sites without surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). They established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise using a partially corroded F-18 wing box and several aluminum panels which had thickness losses from milled flat-bottom holes. The authors mapped the lap splice composite thermal inertia, (k{rho}c){sup 1/2}, which characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Corrosion invaded the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine, where they observed ``pillowing`` from volume build-up of corrosion by-products.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
64675
Report Number(s):
CONF-931193-
ISBN 0-931403-23-5; TRN: IM9528%%335
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) fall conference and quality testing show: NDT - a partner in engineering innovation, Long Beach, CA (United States), 8-12 Nov 1993; Other Information: PBD: 1993; Related Information: Is Part Of ASNT 1993 fall conference and quality testing show. NDT: A partner in engineering innovation; PB: 193 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; AIRCRAFT; CORROSION; INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Del Grande, N.K.. Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Del Grande, N.K.. Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft. United States.
Del Grande, N.K.. Fri . "Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft". United States.
@article{osti_64675,
title = {Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft},
author = {Del Grande, N.K.},
abstractNote = {Aircraft skin thickness-loss from corrosion has been measured using dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging on a flash-heated Boeing 737 fuselage structure. The authors mapped surface temperature differences of 0.2 to 0.6 C for 5 to 14 % thickness losses within corroded lap splices at 0.4 seconds after the heat flash. The procedure mapped surface temperature differences at sites without surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). They established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise using a partially corroded F-18 wing box and several aluminum panels which had thickness losses from milled flat-bottom holes. The authors mapped the lap splice composite thermal inertia, (k{rho}c){sup 1/2}, which characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Corrosion invaded the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine, where they observed ``pillowing`` from volume build-up of corrosion by-products.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1993},
month = {Fri Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1993}
}

Book:
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