skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present

Abstract

In selecting these historical documents the authors have applied three general tests: first, does the document help tell the story of the development of American nuclear policy in a nontechnical way; second, is the source primary rather than secondary, written by an actor in the drama rather than by a member of the audience; third, does the document provide coverage of the major chapters in the story. The Manhattan Project was America's $2 billion secret project to build an atomic bomb. Many documents associated with the project have come to light only in recent years. In Section II they use the letters of J. Robert Oppenheimer and the recently declassified minutes of policy committees to tell the story of how the bomb was designed and built and how the decision was made to drop the first uranium and plutonium devices on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. How did a weapon of war become the key to a peacetime industry. In considering atomic energy after World War II, they focus in Section III on the legislative enabling acts that established the Atomic Energy Commission, the short-lived dream of international control of nuclear weapons under the Baruch Plan,more » and the ''atoms for peace'' program of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. By 1954 the highly classified work on nuclear weapons paralleled a new development of nuclear energy and power reactors. Knowledge was shared with both private industry and other countries. The fruits of this program are considered in the later section on nuclear power.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6460015
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR ENERGY; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; USA; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; ATOMIC ENERGY LAWS; DECISION MAKING; ENERGY POLICY; FISSION; HIROSHIMA; NAGASAKI; NATIONAL DEFENSE; POWER REACTORS; UNITED KINGDOM; US AEC; WARFARE; ASIA; ENERGY; EUROPE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; JAPAN; LAWS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; POWER PLANTS; REACTORS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; US ORGANIZATIONS; WEAPONS; WESTERN EUROPE; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 290200 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology; 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation

Citation Formats

Williams, R C, and Cantelon, P L. The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Williams, R C, & Cantelon, P L. The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present. United States.
Williams, R C, and Cantelon, P L. 1984. "The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present". United States.
@article{osti_6460015,
title = {The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present},
author = {Williams, R C and Cantelon, P L},
abstractNote = {In selecting these historical documents the authors have applied three general tests: first, does the document help tell the story of the development of American nuclear policy in a nontechnical way; second, is the source primary rather than secondary, written by an actor in the drama rather than by a member of the audience; third, does the document provide coverage of the major chapters in the story. The Manhattan Project was America's $2 billion secret project to build an atomic bomb. Many documents associated with the project have come to light only in recent years. In Section II they use the letters of J. Robert Oppenheimer and the recently declassified minutes of policy committees to tell the story of how the bomb was designed and built and how the decision was made to drop the first uranium and plutonium devices on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. How did a weapon of war become the key to a peacetime industry. In considering atomic energy after World War II, they focus in Section III on the legislative enabling acts that established the Atomic Energy Commission, the short-lived dream of international control of nuclear weapons under the Baruch Plan, and the ''atoms for peace'' program of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. By 1954 the highly classified work on nuclear weapons paralleled a new development of nuclear energy and power reactors. Knowledge was shared with both private industry and other countries. The fruits of this program are considered in the later section on nuclear power.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6460015}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1984},
month = {1}
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share: