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Title: Oil agglomeration and pelletizing

Abstract

Although the normal cleaning of ultrafine coal sizes (generally below 0.5 millimeter) is by various froth flotation techniques, there are many situations where inferior results are obtained. These occur particularly where the coal has poor floatability characteristics and/or contains excessive amounts of extremely fine sizes (minus 0.075 millimeter) of clay minerals. To overcome these situations, other methods of cleaning have been devised. These methods are: the treatment of slimes on Deister tables; the use of compund water-only cyclones; and the use of oil agglomeration. Oil agglomeration holds considerable promise, and a great deal of work in recent years has been directed toward improving its capabilities. It is based upon the natural affinity of hydrophobic coal particles to various types of oil, such as kerosene or diesel oil, leaving the hydrophilic material, such as shales and clay, in the water untouched by the oil. With proper stirring in an agitator and under controlled conditions, the coal collects with the oil into an amalgam, flakes, or into spheres or pellets that are dewatered over screens into a low ash, low moisture, product. The process appears to effectively clean ultra-fine coal slurry, and to produce relativey low moisture pellets at relatively low cost.more » One of the secrets is the adding of the oil in an emulsified or homogenized form, causing much greater spreading of the oil on the coal surfaces. Various processes are described briefly.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6459150
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6459150
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
World Coal; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL FINES; AGGLOMERATION; CLEANING; PELLETIZING; COAL PREPARATION; DIESEL FUELS; COMMINUTION; FABRICATION; MOLDING 013000* -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Transport, Handling, & Storage

Citation Formats

Zimmerman, R.E. Oil agglomeration and pelletizing. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Zimmerman, R.E. Oil agglomeration and pelletizing. United States.
Zimmerman, R.E. Thu . "Oil agglomeration and pelletizing". United States.
@article{osti_6459150,
title = {Oil agglomeration and pelletizing},
author = {Zimmerman, R.E.},
abstractNote = {Although the normal cleaning of ultrafine coal sizes (generally below 0.5 millimeter) is by various froth flotation techniques, there are many situations where inferior results are obtained. These occur particularly where the coal has poor floatability characteristics and/or contains excessive amounts of extremely fine sizes (minus 0.075 millimeter) of clay minerals. To overcome these situations, other methods of cleaning have been devised. These methods are: the treatment of slimes on Deister tables; the use of compund water-only cyclones; and the use of oil agglomeration. Oil agglomeration holds considerable promise, and a great deal of work in recent years has been directed toward improving its capabilities. It is based upon the natural affinity of hydrophobic coal particles to various types of oil, such as kerosene or diesel oil, leaving the hydrophilic material, such as shales and clay, in the water untouched by the oil. With proper stirring in an agitator and under controlled conditions, the coal collects with the oil into an amalgam, flakes, or into spheres or pellets that are dewatered over screens into a low ash, low moisture, product. The process appears to effectively clean ultra-fine coal slurry, and to produce relativey low moisture pellets at relatively low cost. One of the secrets is the adding of the oil in an emulsified or homogenized form, causing much greater spreading of the oil on the coal surfaces. Various processes are described briefly.},
doi = {},
journal = {World Coal; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 5:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}