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Title: High-voltage, high-speed switching transistors using current-mode second breakdown

Abstract

Current mode second breakdown is a fast negative resistance phenomenon which occurs in bipolar epitaxial transistors and which can be used to generate fast rise time electrical pulses. This paper describes a study of this effect and the design of devices capable of generating pulses of greater than 500 volts with 3 to 4 ns rise time.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6443325
Report Number(s):
UCRL-88309; CONF-830517-2
ON: DE83006745
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 33. electronic components conference, Orlando, FL, USA, 16 May 1983
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; TRANSISTORS; BREAKDOWN; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; PERFORMANCE TESTING; PULSES; DATA; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; TESTING; 420800* - Engineering- Electronic Circuits & Devices- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Pocha, M.D., and Koo, J.C. High-voltage, high-speed switching transistors using current-mode second breakdown. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Pocha, M.D., & Koo, J.C. High-voltage, high-speed switching transistors using current-mode second breakdown. United States.
Pocha, M.D., and Koo, J.C. Fri . "High-voltage, high-speed switching transistors using current-mode second breakdown". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6443325,
title = {High-voltage, high-speed switching transistors using current-mode second breakdown},
author = {Pocha, M.D. and Koo, J.C.},
abstractNote = {Current mode second breakdown is a fast negative resistance phenomenon which occurs in bipolar epitaxial transistors and which can be used to generate fast rise time electrical pulses. This paper describes a study of this effect and the design of devices capable of generating pulses of greater than 500 volts with 3 to 4 ns rise time.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 04 00:00:00 EST 1983},
month = {Fri Feb 04 00:00:00 EST 1983}
}

Conference:
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