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Title: Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

Abstract

It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressuremore » in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
644293
Report Number(s):
CONF-980606-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 98:008220
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Transactions of the American Nuclear Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 78; Conference: Annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society, Nashville, TN (United States), 7-12 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPE AND RADIATION SOURCE TECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; CAVITATION; WATER; MERCURY; ACCELERATOR FACILITIES; NEUTRON SOURCES; TARGETS; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Taleyarkhan, R P, Gulec, K, West, C D, and Haines, J. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Taleyarkhan, R P, Gulec, K, West, C D, & Haines, J. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury. United States.
Taleyarkhan, R P, Gulec, K, West, C D, and Haines, J. 1998. "Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury". United States.
@article{osti_644293,
title = {Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury},
author = {Taleyarkhan, R P and Gulec, K and West, C D and Haines, J},
abstractNote = {It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/644293}, journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {9}
}