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Title: Oil price hikes focus on utility frustrations

Abstract

Utilities, in spite of efforts to switch from oil to other fuels, will find the need to increase electric rates to cover the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries' (OPEC) price rise will cause further deterioration in public relations. Oil-fired plants now generate about 15 percent of U.S. electricity, but because these plants are concentrated in Southern California and the East Coast, the economic impact will be concentrated in these areas. Utilities have been frustrated in their efforts to switch because of environmental restrictions on new coal and nuclear plants which will force them to continue using expensive imported oil and deprive them of abundant domestic resources. If consumers resist rate increases and fuel adjustment clauses, the utilities' ability to remain viable and to develop new capacity using other fuels will erode even further.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6442626
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6442626
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Electr. Light Power (Boston); (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 57:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; CHARGES; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; RATE STRUCTURE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; PUBLIC UTILITIES 296000* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Electric Power; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Not Available. Oil price hikes focus on utility frustrations. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Not Available. Oil price hikes focus on utility frustrations. United States.
Not Available. Thu . "Oil price hikes focus on utility frustrations". United States.
@article{osti_6442626,
title = {Oil price hikes focus on utility frustrations},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Utilities, in spite of efforts to switch from oil to other fuels, will find the need to increase electric rates to cover the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries' (OPEC) price rise will cause further deterioration in public relations. Oil-fired plants now generate about 15 percent of U.S. electricity, but because these plants are concentrated in Southern California and the East Coast, the economic impact will be concentrated in these areas. Utilities have been frustrated in their efforts to switch because of environmental restrictions on new coal and nuclear plants which will force them to continue using expensive imported oil and deprive them of abundant domestic resources. If consumers resist rate increases and fuel adjustment clauses, the utilities' ability to remain viable and to develop new capacity using other fuels will erode even further.},
doi = {},
journal = {Electr. Light Power (Boston); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 57:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}