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Title: Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress

Abstract

On April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) experienced a devastating accident. This accident left much of the plant and its safety systems destroyed with widespread radioactive waste contamination from the damaged nuclear fuel. In the 6 months following the accident, heroic measures were taken to stabilize the situation and erect a temporary confinement shelter over the damaged unit 4. Since that time the shelter and the contained radioactive materials and debris have begun to deteriorate. Lack of funding and staff has allowed only minor improvements to occur on-site, resulting in an existing shelter that is unstable and deteriorating. International aid has been provided to develop a comprehensive plan for the safe and environmentally sound conversion of the damaged Chernobyl reactor. These efforts are being performed in conjunction with US experts, European experts, and local Chernobyl NPP personnel. This plan is discussed here.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
644242
Report Number(s):
CONF-980606-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 98:008171
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; Journal Volume: 78; Conference: Annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society, Nashville, TN (United States), 7-12 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; PLANNING; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; REMEDIAL ACTION

Citation Formats

Johnson, W., Kreid, D., and DeFranco, W.. Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Johnson, W., Kreid, D., & DeFranco, W.. Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress. United States.
Johnson, W., Kreid, D., and DeFranco, W.. Tue . "Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_644242,
title = {Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress},
author = {Johnson, W. and Kreid, D. and DeFranco, W.},
abstractNote = {On April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) experienced a devastating accident. This accident left much of the plant and its safety systems destroyed with widespread radioactive waste contamination from the damaged nuclear fuel. In the 6 months following the accident, heroic measures were taken to stabilize the situation and erect a temporary confinement shelter over the damaged unit 4. Since that time the shelter and the contained radioactive materials and debris have begun to deteriorate. Lack of funding and staff has allowed only minor improvements to occur on-site, resulting in an existing shelter that is unstable and deteriorating. International aid has been provided to develop a comprehensive plan for the safe and environmentally sound conversion of the damaged Chernobyl reactor. These efforts are being performed in conjunction with US experts, European experts, and local Chernobyl NPP personnel. This plan is discussed here.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
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