skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: High average power induction accelerators

Abstract

The induction accelerator is discussed with respect to general background and concept, beam transport, scaling, pulse power technology, and the electron beam injector. A discussion of the factors which affect the scaling of the intensity of the beam is given. Limiting factors include collective forces in the beam, virtual cathode formation, surroundings, and beam breakup instability. 24 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (ed.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6441461
Report Number(s):
UCID-20605
ON: DE86005288
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 42 ENGINEERING; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; BEAM INJECTION; BEAM TRANSPORT; DESIGN; POWER SUPPLIES; ELECTRON-RING ACCELERATORS; FOCUSING; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; INDUCTION; INSTABILITY; SPACE CHARGE; ACCELERATORS; COLLECTIVE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; LASERS; 430200* - Particle Accelerators- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics; 430302 - Particle Accelerators- Injection & Extraction Systems; 420300 - Engineering- Lasers- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Swingle, J.C. High average power induction accelerators. United States: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.2172/6441461.
Swingle, J.C. High average power induction accelerators. United States. doi:10.2172/6441461.
Swingle, J.C. 1985. "High average power induction accelerators". United States. doi:10.2172/6441461. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6441461.
@article{osti_6441461,
title = {High average power induction accelerators},
author = {Swingle, J.C.},
abstractNote = {The induction accelerator is discussed with respect to general background and concept, beam transport, scaling, pulse power technology, and the electron beam injector. A discussion of the factors which affect the scaling of the intensity of the beam is given. Limiting factors include collective forces in the beam, virtual cathode formation, surroundings, and beam breakup instability. 24 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)},
doi = {10.2172/6441461},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month =
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Short-pulse accelerator technology developed during time period from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is now being extended to high average power systems capable of being used in industrial and environmental applications. Processes requiring high dose levels and/or high volume throughput may require systems with beam power levels from several hundreds of kilowatts to megawatts. Processes may include chemical waste mitigation, flue gas cleanup, food pasteurization, and new forms of materials preparation and treatment. This paper will address the present status of high average power systems now in operation that use combinations of semiconductor and saturable core magnetic switchesmore » with inductive voltage adders to achieve MeV beams of electrons or x-rays over areas of 10,000 cm{sup 2} or more. Similar high average power technology is also being used below 1 MeV to drive repetitive ion beam sources for treatment of material surfaces.« less
  • The marriage of induction linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 Mev/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to allow us to demonstrate some of these concepts. Progress on this project is reported here.
  • Short-pulse accelerator technology developed during the early 1960`s through the late 1980`s is being extended to high average power systems capable of use in industrial and environmental applications. Processes requiring high dose levels and/or high volume throughput will require systems with beam power levels from several hundreds of kilowatts to megawatts. Beam accelerating potentials can range from less than 1 MeV to as much as 10 MeV depending on the type of beam, depth of penetration required, and the density of the product being treated. This paper addresses the present status of a family of high average power systems, withmore » output beam power levels up to 200 kW, now in operation that use saturable core switches to achieve output pulse widths of 50 to 80 nanoseconds. Inductive adders and field emission cathodes are used to generate beams of electrons or x-rays at up to 2.5 MeV over areas of 1000 cm{sup 2}. Similar high average power technology is being used at {le} 1 MeV to drive repetitive ion beam sources for treatment of material surfaces over 100`s of cm{sup 2}.« less
  • The design of the baseline accelerator system excluding the injector and extractor appears relatively straightforward. Some development is needed particularly involving the insulation system for the vertical field coil, but no major technological advancements are necessary. The resulting system requires characterization of field errors and perturbations and of the match between vertical magnetic field and particle energy. Unfortunately it is not known whether the accelerating environment produced by the baseline design described above is consistent with stable beam acceleration. Synchronization of the vertical magnetic field with particle energy can be provided by a simple passive integration of the acceleration pulsemore » in the baseline design.« less
  • In applications where multiple magnetic modulators are used to drive a single Linear Induction Voltage Adder (LIVA) or Linear Accelerator (LINAC), it is essential that the outputs of the modulators by synchronized. Output rise times are typically in the 10ns to 20ns range, often making it necessary to synchronize to within less than 1ns. Microprocessor and electronic feedback schemes have been developed and demonstrated that achieve the required level of synchronization, however, they are sophisticated and potentially complex. In a quest for simplicity, this work seeks to determine the achievable level of modulator to modulator timing jitter that can bemore » obtained with simple design practices and passive techniques. Sources of output pulse time jitter in magnetic modulators are reviewed and some basic modulator design principles that can be used to minimize the intrinsic time jitter between modulators are discussed. A novel technique for passive synchronization is presented.« less