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Title: Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility

Abstract

The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) will be able to test up to six large superconducting coils similar to those required for a tokamak reactor. In order to simulate the transient vertical field that will be part of the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak reactor, a set of pulse coils will be used in the facility. This set of two coils can be positioned in the bore of any of the test coils to provide a transient magnetic field to that particular coil. This paper describes the final design of the pulse coils and discusses the fabrication techniques used to build these coils. An extensive testing program has been carried out during fabrication to ensure that the coils will function satisfactorily.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Union Carbide Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (USA). Nuclear Div.; Magnetic Corp. of America, Waltham, MA
OSTI Identifier:
6430851
Report Number(s):
CONF-831203-187
ON: DE85002569
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. symposium on fusion engineering, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 5 Dec 1983; Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; LARGE COIL PROGRAM; POWER SUPPLIES; DESIGN; FABRICATION; MAGNET COILS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; PULSES; ELECTRIC COILS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; TESTING; 700202* - Fusion Power Plant Technology- Magnet Coils & Fields

Citation Formats

Chipley, K.K., and Parrelli, A.P. Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Chipley, K.K., & Parrelli, A.P. Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility. United States.
Chipley, K.K., and Parrelli, A.P. Sat . "Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6430851.
@article{osti_6430851,
title = {Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility},
author = {Chipley, K.K. and Parrelli, A.P.},
abstractNote = {The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) will be able to test up to six large superconducting coils similar to those required for a tokamak reactor. In order to simulate the transient vertical field that will be part of the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak reactor, a set of pulse coils will be used in the facility. This set of two coils can be positioned in the bore of any of the test coils to provide a transient magnetic field to that particular coil. This paper describes the final design of the pulse coils and discusses the fabrication techniques used to build these coils. An extensive testing program has been carried out during fabrication to ensure that the coils will function satisfactorily.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1983},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1983}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW permore » coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls.« less
  • The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being constructed to test up to six large superconducting coils of the configuration needed for tokamak reactors. In order to subject these test coils to conditions which simulate the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak, it is necessary to provide transient vertical fields at the test coil. The LCTF does this by means of a pulse coil set which can be positioned in the bore of each coil. The coils are tested one at a time while the remaining five test coils provide a background toroidal field. Since the pulse coil set ismore » a part of the facility and not considered as a developmental item, it is designed to utilize conventional coil materials and fabrication techniques. The operating environment and magnitude of the induced loads make this coil set somewhat unique. This paper discusses the required operating parameters, the operating environment and loads, as well as the design features of the coils.« less
  • In order to simulate the transient fields which would be imposed on superconducting toroidal field coils in an operating tokamak reactor, the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand includes a set of pulse coils. This set of pulse coils is designed to be moved from one test location to another within the LCTF vacuum vessel while the vessel is operating under vacuum and the test stand and test coils are at an operating temperature of 4.2K. This operating environment and the extremely high magnetic loads have necessitated some unique design features for the pulse coil support and transport system.more » The support structure for the pulse coil must react high overturning moments and axial loads induced on the pulse coil by the interaction of the pulse field with the field generated by the large test coils. These loads are reacted into the test stand support structure or spider frame by an arrangement of six pedestals and a support beam. In order to move the pulse coil set from one test location to another, the support beam containing the pulse coils must be driven across rollers mounted on the pedestals, then clamped securely to react the loads. Because these operations must be performed in a vacuum environment at cryogenic tmperature, special consideration was given to component design.« less
  • Participants in the international Large Coil Task (LCT) have designed, built, and tested six different toroidal field coils. Each coil has a 2.5- by 3.5-m, D-shaped bore and a current between 10 and 18 kA and is designed to demonstrate stable operation at 8 T, with a superimposed averaged pulsed field of 0.14 T in 1.0 s and simulated nuclear heating. Testing of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and was successfully completed on September 3, 1987, in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes electromagnetic propertiesmore » of LCT coils measured in different modes of energization and fast dump. Effects of mutual coupling and induced eddy currents are analyzed and discussed. Measurements of the ac loss caused by the superimposed pulsed fields are summarized. Finally, the interpretation of the test results and their relevance to practical fusion are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tab.« less