skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Thermoelectrochemical cycles for power and hydrogen production. [Regenerative H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cell cycle based on high-temperature electrolysis]

Abstract

Based on electrochemical mechanisms a new power cycle for converting thermal to electrical energy is presented. The cycle is referred to as the thermoelectrochemical (TEC) power cycle. The general principle involves combining the electrochemical decomposition of a compound to its elements at a condition where the free energy change is low with the recombination of the same or a different compound from its elements at a condition where the free energy change is high. The difference in free energies gives a net difference in electromotive force which results in a net power output for the system. The power cycle combines the operation of an electrolyzer at a high temperature low emf condition, with a fuel cell at a low temperature high emf condition. The thermal energy is used to provide the high level heat in the electrolyzer while the low level heat is rejected in the fuel cell. Heat is thus converted to DC electricity. Ideal power cycle efficiencies are equal to the Carnot efficiency for non-condensing systems. The principles are illustrated with a H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/--H/sub 2/O system and with a H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/--HCl system. Other cycles are described. The benefits of the TEC cycle is that itmore » produces electricity from thermal energy with no moving parts and at moderate pressures, potentially making this sytem mechanically a highly reliable one. The high temperature material stability problem must be balanced against the increased thermal efficiency of the power cycle. TEC may have especially suitable applications for the production of electrometals, (Al and Cu), electrochemicals and synthetic fuels because of the direct use of the DC current generated in the cycle. It is recommended that these systems be further developed and evaluated.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6429796
Report Number(s):
BNL-24387; CONF-780807-12
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-76-C-02-0016
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. world hydrogen energy conference, Zurich, Switzerland, 21 Aug 1978
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 08 HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS; DESIGN; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; ELECTROLYSIS; REGENERATIVE FUEL CELLS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHLORINE; EFFICIENCY; ELECTROLYTIC CELLS; ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE; ENTHALPY; ENTROPY; FREE ENERGY; HEAT SOURCES; HIGH TEMPERATURE; HYDROGEN GENERATORS; OPERATION; OXYGEN; THERMODYNAMICS; WATER; CRYOGENIC FLUIDS; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS; ELEMENTS; ENERGY; FLUIDS; FUEL CELLS; HALOGENS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; LYSIS; NONMETALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; 300501* - Fuel Cells- Design & Development; 080101 - Hydrogen- Production- Electrolysis

Citation Formats

Steinberg, M. Thermoelectrochemical cycles for power and hydrogen production. [Regenerative H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cell cycle based on high-temperature electrolysis]. United States: N. p., 1978. Web.
Steinberg, M. Thermoelectrochemical cycles for power and hydrogen production. [Regenerative H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cell cycle based on high-temperature electrolysis]. United States.
Steinberg, M. 1978. "Thermoelectrochemical cycles for power and hydrogen production. [Regenerative H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cell cycle based on high-temperature electrolysis]". United States.
@article{osti_6429796,
title = {Thermoelectrochemical cycles for power and hydrogen production. [Regenerative H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cell cycle based on high-temperature electrolysis]},
author = {Steinberg, M},
abstractNote = {Based on electrochemical mechanisms a new power cycle for converting thermal to electrical energy is presented. The cycle is referred to as the thermoelectrochemical (TEC) power cycle. The general principle involves combining the electrochemical decomposition of a compound to its elements at a condition where the free energy change is low with the recombination of the same or a different compound from its elements at a condition where the free energy change is high. The difference in free energies gives a net difference in electromotive force which results in a net power output for the system. The power cycle combines the operation of an electrolyzer at a high temperature low emf condition, with a fuel cell at a low temperature high emf condition. The thermal energy is used to provide the high level heat in the electrolyzer while the low level heat is rejected in the fuel cell. Heat is thus converted to DC electricity. Ideal power cycle efficiencies are equal to the Carnot efficiency for non-condensing systems. The principles are illustrated with a H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/--H/sub 2/O system and with a H/sub 2/--O/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/--HCl system. Other cycles are described. The benefits of the TEC cycle is that it produces electricity from thermal energy with no moving parts and at moderate pressures, potentially making this sytem mechanically a highly reliable one. The high temperature material stability problem must be balanced against the increased thermal efficiency of the power cycle. TEC may have especially suitable applications for the production of electrometals, (Al and Cu), electrochemicals and synthetic fuels because of the direct use of the DC current generated in the cycle. It is recommended that these systems be further developed and evaluated.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6429796}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1978},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: