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Title: Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)

Abstract

Plastic shelters were used to grow red oak seedlings on good-to-excellent Appalachian hardwood growing sites in north central West Virginia. Preliminary results indicate that shelters have the potential to stimulate development of red oak seedlingheight growth, especially if height growth continues once the seedling tops are above the 5-foot-tall shelters.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Forest Service, Radnor, PA (United States). Northeastern Forest Experiment Station
OSTI Identifier:
6420913
Report Number(s):
PB-93-190916/XAB; FSRP-NE--672
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; SEEDLINGS; PLANT GROWTH; APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION; BIOMASS; CARBON DIOXIDE; DAMAGE; DEER; FORESTS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; HEIGHT; HUMIDITY; MAMMALS; MANAGEMENT; PLASTICS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SAFETY; SHELTERS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TREES; US FOREST SERVICE; VIRGINIA; WEST VIRGINIA; ANIMALS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DIMENSIONS; ENERGY SOURCES; GROWTH; MATERIALS; MOUNTAINS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLANTS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; RUMINANTS; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS; US DOA; US ORGANIZATIONS; USA; VERTEBRATES 090700* -- Biomass Fuels-- Resources-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Smith, H.C.. Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final). United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Smith, H.C.. Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final). United States.
Smith, H.C.. 1993. "Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6420913,
title = {Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)},
author = {Smith, H.C.},
abstractNote = {Plastic shelters were used to grow red oak seedlings on good-to-excellent Appalachian hardwood growing sites in north central West Virginia. Preliminary results indicate that shelters have the potential to stimulate development of red oak seedlingheight growth, especially if height growth continues once the seedling tops are above the 5-foot-tall shelters.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:
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  • The report examines the growth and survival of planted and natural red oak seedlings and seedlings from planted acorns within translucent tan tree shelters, fences, and unprotected controls under a shelterwood seed-cut stand. Seedlings planted within tree shelters and fences were inside tree shelters. Natural seedlings grew very little and their height inside and outside of tree shelters did not differ. Recommendations based on these results should improve results from the use of tree shelters.
  • The effects of fertilization on the growth and development of a Japanese larch plantation in central West Virginia were evaluated after 9 years. Mean height and diameter growth of the larch trees were greater on the unfertilized plots. Foliar and soil chemical analyses were used to examine this apparent anomaly. Japanese larch demonstrated an ability to grow well on a very nutrient-deficient site and was not damaged by deer browsing.
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  • The survival, growth, and rate of target canker infection of 34 black walnut (Juglans nigra) families were evaluated 15 years after establishment in north-central West Virginia. The progenies originated at locations in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. There were significant differences between families in survival, incidence of target-canker infection, total height, and diameter at breast height. The North Carolina and Tennessee sources were less suitable for the growing conditions of the test site, local and slightly more northern sources seem more suitable. Near the northern extremity of the range of black walnut, maintaining a viable native population ofmore » this species and using local seed sources in artificial regeneration activities are recommended.« less
  • Survival, total height, diameter at breast height (d.b.h.), and stem quality of sugar maple trees of different provenances were compared 25 years after establishment in north-central West Virginia. Provenances were from Michigan, Minnesota, West Virginia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, and Quebec, Canada. There were significant differences between provenances for all traits except stem quality. By provenance, total tree height ranged from about 49 to 37 feet; d.b.h. from 6.7 to 3.6 inches; and survival from 100 to 15 percent. The predictability of total tree height 25 years after establishment based on mean provenance height at age 2, 6, 10,more » and 15 years is discussed.« less