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Title: Evaluation of pristine lignin for hazardous-waste treatment

Abstract

A feasibility study was conducted to assess the utilization of lignin, isolated from a steam-exploded hardwood (Tulip poplar) with 95% ethanol and 0.1n NaOH, as a potential adsorbent for hazardous-waste treatment. Eight organic compounds and two heavy metals were selected to allow comparison of lignin isolates with activated carbon. It was found that the adsorption capacity of lignin for heavy metals (chromium and lead) is comparable to activated carbon, despite a huge divergence in surface area (0.1 mS/g vs. 1000 mS/g). The surface area discrepancy and the extensive aromatic substitution in lignin macromolecule impeded the achievement of an adsorption capacity of lignin for polar organic compounds which would allow it to be cost-competitive with activated carbon although results with phenol and, to a lesser degree, naphthalene indicate significant potential for achieving competitive capacities. A recommended plan for surface area and structural enhancement is presented on the basis that lignin can be developed as an effective and low-cost adsorbent for polar priority pollutants and/or as an ion-exchange resins for heavy-metal wastewater clean-up.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6417891
Report Number(s):
PB-87-191664/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE PROCESSING; LIGNIN; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WASTE WATER; ION EXCHANGE; ACTIVATED CARBON; ADSORPTION; LIQUID WASTES; PERFORMANCE; REACTION KINETICS; SOLID WASTES; ADSORBENTS; CARBOHYDRATES; CARBON; CONTROL; ELEMENTS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; KINETICS; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION CONTROL; POLYSACCHARIDES; PROCESSING; SACCHARIDES; SORPTION; SURFACE PROPERTIES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; WATER 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

O'Neil, D.J., Newman, C.J., Chian, E.S.K., and Gao, H.. Evaluation of pristine lignin for hazardous-waste treatment. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
O'Neil, D.J., Newman, C.J., Chian, E.S.K., & Gao, H.. Evaluation of pristine lignin for hazardous-waste treatment. United States.
O'Neil, D.J., Newman, C.J., Chian, E.S.K., and Gao, H.. 1987. "Evaluation of pristine lignin for hazardous-waste treatment". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6417891,
title = {Evaluation of pristine lignin for hazardous-waste treatment},
author = {O'Neil, D.J. and Newman, C.J. and Chian, E.S.K. and Gao, H.},
abstractNote = {A feasibility study was conducted to assess the utilization of lignin, isolated from a steam-exploded hardwood (Tulip poplar) with 95% ethanol and 0.1n NaOH, as a potential adsorbent for hazardous-waste treatment. Eight organic compounds and two heavy metals were selected to allow comparison of lignin isolates with activated carbon. It was found that the adsorption capacity of lignin for heavy metals (chromium and lead) is comparable to activated carbon, despite a huge divergence in surface area (0.1 mS/g vs. 1000 mS/g). The surface area discrepancy and the extensive aromatic substitution in lignin macromolecule impeded the achievement of an adsorption capacity of lignin for polar organic compounds which would allow it to be cost-competitive with activated carbon although results with phenol and, to a lesser degree, naphthalene indicate significant potential for achieving competitive capacities. A recommended plan for surface area and structural enhancement is presented on the basis that lignin can be developed as an effective and low-cost adsorbent for polar priority pollutants and/or as an ion-exchange resins for heavy-metal wastewater clean-up.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 5
}

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