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Title: Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986

Abstract

Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermalmore » and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks AFB, TX (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6406772
Report Number(s):
AD-A-179275/3/XAB; USAFSAM-JA-86-43
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Pub. in Physiological Chemistry and Physics and Medical NMR, Vol. 18, 181-187(1986)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LEUKOCYTES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CHEMILUMINESCENCE; CONTROL; HYDRAZIDES; HYPERTHERMIA; INCUBATION; INDEXES; METABOLISM; MICROWAVE RADIATION; OXIDATION; RADIOTHERAPY; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; BODY TEMPERATURE; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; LUMINESCENCE; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY 560400* -- Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Kiel, J.L., Wong, L.S., and Erwin, D.N. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Kiel, J.L., Wong, L.S., & Erwin, D.N. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986. United States.
Kiel, J.L., Wong, L.S., and Erwin, D.N. 1986. "Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6406772,
title = {Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986},
author = {Kiel, J.L. and Wong, L.S. and Erwin, D.N.},
abstractNote = {Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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  • The effects of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, continuous wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 +/- 4.2 W/kg) and convection heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 degrees C were investigated. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photometer. A significant stimulation after microwave exposure (p less than 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 degrees C incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation compared to incubator controls was also detected after shammore » treatment. There was no significant difference between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the microwave and sham exposed groups. It appears that exposure to microwave radiation, under normothermic (37 +/- 0.03 degrees C) conditions, has no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between microwave or sham exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator controls did not exceed 35.9 degrees C and this temperature required 39 minutes to reach from 22 degrees C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and radiofrequency radiation studies in vitro.« less
  • Human mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to 2450 MHz microwaves pulse-modulated at 16 Hz or at 60 Hz, at specific absorption rates up to 4 mW/ml. Such exposures produced no detectable effects on leukocyte viability, or on unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated DNA synthesis or total protein synthesis. The data provided no evidence that exposure to pulse-modulated microwaves is more likely to alter human leukocyte function than is exposure to continuous waves at equivalent energy levels.
  • Previous studies demonstrated an increased in-vivo and in-vitro release of immunoreactive thromboxane B2 (TXB2) four hours after 20.0-Gy whole-body irradiation. This radiation-induced increase in TXB2 release was of extrarenal origin. This report confirms that whole-body ionizing radiation exposure results in an increased pulmonary TXB2 release. Since radiation exposure is associated with an increased release of TXB2, the present studies sought to determine if tissue responsiveness was altered to this cyclooxygenase product. Rats were anesthetized (30 mg/kg sodium pentobarbital, i.p.) and exposed to 20.0 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The effect of the radioprotectant, WR2721, on the radiation-induced depression in vascular reactivitymore » was assessed next. The release of TXB2 from the pulmonary bed of irradiated animals was determined. These results indicate the importance of a plasma-like perfusate in studying cyclooxygenase product release from isolated organs. The data also show that radiation exposure will depress vascular reactivity to the TXA2 mimic, U46619. This radiation-induced alteration in vascular reactivity was preventable by treatment of the animals with the radioprotectant, WR2721, prior to irradiation. These results suggest that the altered release of TXB2 seen following lethal doses of gamma radiation may have both physiological ramifications and pharmacological applications.« less
  • Using a specialized waveguide exposure system, the head and neck of 15 Sprague-Dawley rats were selectively exposed to 1250-MHz pulsed microwaves. Blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature were continually recorded. Statistical analysis of the physiological parameters that were recorded continuously revealed that during the exposure the animals exhibited no statistically significant change in core or head temperature, while heart rate decreased over 20%. The mean blood pressure remained constant but exhibited a sinusoidal undulation during exposure that was disassociated from heart rate. Cardiovascular parameters returned to normal soon after cessation of exposure. In summary, statistically significant changes were recorded concomitantmore » with microwave exposure. Blood pressure exhibited a heretofore unreported oscillation, disassociated from heart rate. It is possible that this microwave reaction is mediated via baroreceptor cardiodepressor mechanisms.« less
  • In recent years, the relationship between high-peak-power microwave irradiation and biological systems has generated considerable interest. The relative effects of microwave fields are a function of the exposure fields power density, and specific absorption rate (SAR). Behavior is just as important a determinant of change as is the RF field itself, however, sufficient characterization and comparison requires an analysis that extends over a range of behavior. After training established stable baseline levels, rats were tested pre- and post-exposure for various microwave dose levels (including sham exposure). Analysis of cumulative response records and video-taped exposures failed to show any effects othermore » than thermal for the various pulsed exposures when compared with equivalent average power exposures. This included the highest dose level (108W) which raised the rat's core temperatures up to 2.9 degrees C, and disrupted all activity. However, after approximately 10 minutes, an average decrease of 1.8 degrees allowed the animals to resume their schedules.« less