skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: TI-59 Drilling engineering manual. [Texas Instruments-59 Calculator Programs]

Abstract

Twenty-seven drilling engineering programs to be used with the Texas Instruments 59 programmable calculator are given, with step-by-step explanations on how to input these on the calculator. Programs for basic drilling engineering, drilling fluid viscosity and circulation, hydrostatic pressure due to gas, surge and swab pressure, and well control are given. (JMT)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6404551
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; CALCULATORS; PROGRAMMING; RESERVOIR ENGINEERING; CALCULATION METHODS; FLUID FLOW; NATURAL GAS WELLS; OIL WELLS; VISCOSITY; WELL COMPLETION; WELL DRILLING; DRILLING; ENGINEERING; WELLS; 020300* - Petroleum- Drilling & Production; 030300 - Natural Gas- Drilling, Production, & Processing

Citation Formats

Chenevert, M.E., and Hollo, R. TI-59 Drilling engineering manual. [Texas Instruments-59 Calculator Programs]. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Chenevert, M.E., & Hollo, R. TI-59 Drilling engineering manual. [Texas Instruments-59 Calculator Programs]. United States.
Chenevert, M.E., and Hollo, R. 1981. "TI-59 Drilling engineering manual. [Texas Instruments-59 Calculator Programs]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6404551,
title = {TI-59 Drilling engineering manual. [Texas Instruments-59 Calculator Programs]},
author = {Chenevert, M.E. and Hollo, R.},
abstractNote = {Twenty-seven drilling engineering programs to be used with the Texas Instruments 59 programmable calculator are given, with step-by-step explanations on how to input these on the calculator. Programs for basic drilling engineering, drilling fluid viscosity and circulation, hydrostatic pressure due to gas, surge and swab pressure, and well control are given. (JMT)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 1
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Twenty-seven reservoir engineering programs to be used with the Texas Instruments-59 programmable calculator are presented. The programs include methods, equations, and flow charts which describe the required input and resulting output. Also given with each program is an example and a program listing. (JMT)
  • A comprehensive set of reservoir engineering programs for the HP-41 calculator is presented. The 32 programs are designed to solve complex reservoir engineering problems, providing accurate performance estimates and forecasts by calculating fluid properties at current reservoir conditions for each step of the analysis. Each program includes an overview, equations, examples, user instructions, and program listings. A bar code is supplied so users with Wands can read the programs directly into their calculations. (JMT)
  • This book contains a collection of programs for solving a wide variety of stress problems using both the TI-59 and HP-41CV calculators. Each program is prefaced with a description of the problem to be solved, nomenclature, code restrictions and program limitations. Solutions are explained analytically and then followed by the complete program listing, documentation and checklists. Topics include calculations for pipewall thickness, pressure vessel analysis, reinforcement pads, allowable span, vibration, stress, and two-anchor piping systems.
  • This book helps readers develop a reliable conception of downhole conditions and the ability to accurately assess changing circumstances. Mills features eight HP-41C programs. Contents include: 1. Pressure conditions. 2. Effects of the mud column. 3. Indicators of inflow. 4. The closed-in well. 5. Formation strength. 6. Gas migration. 7. Killing the well. 8. Swabbling. 9. Gas contamination of mud returns. 10. Offshore considerations. 11. Internal blowout. Appendices: 1. Two-way conversion factors. 2. Exercises and solutions. 3. HP-41C programs (Bit pressure loss; Pressure loss in the drillstring; Annular pressure loss; Circulating pressure as an alternative flowrate; Annular velocity; Capacity ofmore » cylinders and annuli; Surge pressures; Well killing by weight and wait method).« less
  • Highly productive wells drilled in the Pearsall field (Austin Chalk) of South Texas have shown that horizontal drilling is an extremely effective technique for developing unrecovered oil and natural gas, particularly in mature hydrocarbon provinces that contain natural fractures. Production can also be enhanced where the reservoir-quality zone or the oil column is thin or where gravity-drainage production occurs. Although they are not current targets of horizontal drilling activity, many other kinds of reservoirs contain depositional heterogeneities that interfere with recovery by vertical wells. Use of horizontal drilling to tap multiple reservoir compartments in these reservoirs has significant potential butmore » has yet to be fully tested. The resource target of unrecovered mobile oil in the nine Texas plays and subplays discussed in this report, amounting to more than 8 billion barrels of oil, warrants further testing of horizontal drilling in areas of depositional heterogeneities and multiple reservoir compartments. The authors summarize geological and engineering characteristics of selected formations in Texas that have been or are potential targets for horizontal drilling.« less