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Title: Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report

Abstract

The book includes technical assessments regarding the environmental implications of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development in thirteen topical areas ranging from Petroleum Industry Operations: Present and Future to A Review of Study Designs for the Detection of Long-term Environmental Effects of Offshore Activities. These technical assessments support an analysis which identifies the following future research needs: Chronic effects from the persistence of medium and high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclics and their degradation products in sediments and cold environments; Residual damage from oil spills to biogenically structured communities such as coastal wetlands, reefs and vegetation beds; Effects of channelization for pipeline routing and navigation on wetlands; Effects of fouling by oil of birds, mammals, and turtles, especially in species in which a large percentage of the population aggregates at certain times; Effects on benthos of drilling discharges accumulated through field development; Effects of produced water discharges generated offshore but discharged into nearshore environments; Effects of noise and other physical disturbances on populations of birds, mammals and turtles; Reduction of fishery stocks due to mortality of eggs and larvae as a result of oil spills; Effects of man-made, usually gravel, islands and causeways in the Arctic on benthosmore » and anadromous fish species.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, Chauvin (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6403226
Report Number(s):
PB-86-104114/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; CONTINENTAL SHELF; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; OFFSHORE DRILLING; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; BENTHOS; ECOLOGY; FISHERIES; HYDROCARBONS; MAMMALS; OIL SPILLS; WATER POLLUTION; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; CONTINENTAL MARGIN; DRILLING; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MINERAL RESOURCES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; RESOURCES; VERTEBRATES 020900* -- Petroleum-- Environmental Aspects; 030800 -- Natural Gas-- Environmental Aspects; 020300 -- Petroleum-- Drilling & Production; 030300 -- Natural Gas-- Drilling, Production, & Processing

Citation Formats

Boesch, D.F., and Rabalais, N.N. Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Boesch, D.F., & Rabalais, N.N. Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report. United States.
Boesch, D.F., and Rabalais, N.N. 1985. "Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6403226,
title = {Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report},
author = {Boesch, D.F. and Rabalais, N.N.},
abstractNote = {The book includes technical assessments regarding the environmental implications of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development in thirteen topical areas ranging from Petroleum Industry Operations: Present and Future to A Review of Study Designs for the Detection of Long-term Environmental Effects of Offshore Activities. These technical assessments support an analysis which identifies the following future research needs: Chronic effects from the persistence of medium and high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclics and their degradation products in sediments and cold environments; Residual damage from oil spills to biogenically structured communities such as coastal wetlands, reefs and vegetation beds; Effects of channelization for pipeline routing and navigation on wetlands; Effects of fouling by oil of birds, mammals, and turtles, especially in species in which a large percentage of the population aggregates at certain times; Effects on benthos of drilling discharges accumulated through field development; Effects of produced water discharges generated offshore but discharged into nearshore environments; Effects of noise and other physical disturbances on populations of birds, mammals and turtles; Reduction of fishery stocks due to mortality of eggs and larvae as a result of oil spills; Effects of man-made, usually gravel, islands and causeways in the Arctic on benthos and anadromous fish species.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 6
}

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