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Title: It ain't necessarily so about high rates: memo to the Fed

Abstract

The author sees high interest rates and the rise of energy prices as the cause of the US economic troubles and the resultant decline of standard of living. Eurodollars have come into the US for investment, raised the domestic money supply and, therefore, nullified the tight money policy of the Federal Reserve Board. The author advocates a plan be devised to cut interest rates below 8% and control credit. (PSB)

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wright Investors' Services, Bridgeport, CT
OSTI Identifier:
6399242
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: N.Y. Times; (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ECONOMIC POLICY; ENERGY; PRICES; ENERGY POLICY; USA; ECONOMY; INTEREST RATE; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; NORTH AMERICA 290200* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology; 530100 -- Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies-- Social & Economic Studies-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Wright, J.W.. It ain't necessarily so about high rates: memo to the Fed. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Wright, J.W.. It ain't necessarily so about high rates: memo to the Fed. United States.
Wright, J.W.. 1981. "It ain't necessarily so about high rates: memo to the Fed". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6399242,
title = {It ain't necessarily so about high rates: memo to the Fed},
author = {Wright, J.W.},
abstractNote = {The author sees high interest rates and the rise of energy prices as the cause of the US economic troubles and the resultant decline of standard of living. Eurodollars have come into the US for investment, raised the domestic money supply and, therefore, nullified the tight money policy of the Federal Reserve Board. The author advocates a plan be devised to cut interest rates below 8% and control credit. (PSB)},
doi = {},
journal = {N.Y. Times; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 6
}
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