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Title: Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

Abstract

Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstonesmore » of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ARAMCO, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
OSTI Identifier:
6395401
Report Number(s):
CONF-870606-
Journal ID: CODEN: AABUD
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States); Journal Volume: 71:5; Conference: American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 7 Jun 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; RESERVOIR ROCK; SAUDI ARABIA; SANDSTONES; CARBONATE ROCKS; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; MISSISSIPPIAN PERIOD; PENNSYLVANIAN PERIOD; PERMIAN PERIOD; SEDIMENTARY BASINS; SHALES; ASIA; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; MINERAL RESOURCES; PALEOZOIC ERA; RESOURCES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Al-Laboun, A.A.. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Al-Laboun, A.A.. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin. United States.
Al-Laboun, A.A.. 1987. "Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6395401,
title = {Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin},
author = {Al-Laboun, A.A.},
abstractNote = {Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 71:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 5
}

Conference:
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  • The Sud-Est basin of France consists of a structural mosaic of Permo-Carboniferous, Mesozoic, and Tertiary subbasins. The complex tectonic evolution of these basins has involved alternating strike-slip, contractional, and extensional episodes. By and large, the prospective late Paleozoic-Mesozoic subbasins and the structures that have influenced their development are buried beneath nonpropsective Tertiary basin fill. The architecture of the younger basins, which is strongly controlled by reactivation of the structures bounding the older basins, provides clues to the structure and evolution of the pre-Tertiary subbasins. In particular, localized basins associated with Eocene (Pyrenean) contraction and Oligocene extension delineate reactivated structures boundingmore » the older subbasins. Regionally significant middle Cretaceous left-lateral strike-slip movement along Mesozoic growth faults resulted in reactivation of Permian-Carboniferous faults having an antithetic trend, right-lateral sense of movement, and associated anticlines. This method of analysis has been used to determine the location, structure, and dynamic evolution of the buried late Paleozoic and Mesozoic subbasins of southeastern France external to the Alps.« less
  • Variation among Permo-Carboniferous tetrapod assemblages demonstrates major transformations in pathways and rates of energy and nutrient transfer, in integration of terrestrial ecosystems and in predominant ecologic modes. Early Carboniferous pathways were through plant detritus to aquatic and terrestrial detritivores and thence to arthropod and vertebrate meso-and macro-predators. Transfer rates (and efficiency) were low as was ecosystem integration; the principal ecologic mode was conservation. Late Carboniferous and Early Permian assemblages demonstrate an expansion in herbivory, primarily in utilization of low-fiber plant tissue by insects. But transfer rates, efficiency and integration were still limited because the larger portion of plant biomass, high-fibermore » tissues, still went into detrital pathways; high-fiber'' herbivores, i.e., tetrapods, were neither abundant or diverse, reflecting limited resources, intense predation and limited capabilities for processing fiber-rich food. The abundance and diversity of tetrapod herbivores in upper Permian assemblages suggests a considerable transfer of energy from high-fiber tissues through these animals to tetrapod predators and thus higher transfer rates and efficiencies. It also brought a shift in ecological mode toward acquisition and regulation and tightened ecosystem integration.« less
  • The Carboniferous Stoddart Group and Permian Belloy Formation record infill of a long-lived graben complex in the center of the Peace River Embayment. The Dawson Creek Graben Complex began down-dropping during deposition of the Rundle Group and Golata Formation and reached its maximum during Kiskatinaw time. The overlying Taylor Flat Formation shows graben filling and graben decay; whereas the flat Permian Belloy Formation beds within and beyond graben limits indicate tectonic stability. The complex comprised the larger Fort St. John Graben and satellite Hines Creek, Whitelaw, and Cindy grabens. The grabens consist of kilometer-scale horst and graben blocks bounded bymore » normal faults. The internal blocks subsided at various rates, with differential subsidence occurring in the form of horsts subsiding slower than neighboring grabens. Syn- and post-depositional growth-type normal faults controlled formation and bed thickness, as did inter- and intra-formation unconformities. From these observations, a structural/stratigraphic model can be constructed that explains the complex stratigraphy and depositional interpretations. This model describes a basin dominated by tectonic controls rather than global sea-level events. Syn- and post-sedimentary growth-type block faulting, differential subsidence of fault blocks, sedimentary infill, and unconformity truncation were the major controls on the basin. The model provides an analog to grabens and block-faulted basins of growth-faulted basins occurring elsewhere. The implications of the model to petroleum exploration are that all beds can be correlated by assuming that beds were essentially flat-lying prior to and during faulting. The combination of the block-faulted character and complex facies changes provides many structural and stratigraphic petroleum traps.« less
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  • The People's Republic of China is the largest producer of coal in the world, the most populous country, and is experiencing a significant growth in GNP. Three-fourths of China's energy requirements are met by burning coal. At least 80 percent of the produced coal is Permo-Carboniferous, ranging in rank from bituminous to anthracite ([open quotes]hardcoal[close quotes]), and is mined from underground facilities that typically are very gas-prone. The coal resources of China, estimated at 7.7 to 12.1 trillion tons, are among the largest in the world. Much of this in-place resource consists of Permo-Carboniferous hardcoal. The resource base of coalbedmore » methane (CBM) in China, variously estimated at 1,000 to 2,800 Tcf, may be the world's largest. A significant portion of this valuable energy source is believed to be contained in Permo-Carboniferous coals. The government of China is seeking international technology and investment to develop and utilize CBM, which is expected to improve the nation's economy, increase mine safety, and reduce the wasteful and polluting emissions of methane from coal mines. In particular, the government is emphasizing development of CBM in the North China Basin region, the locale of the most abundant and highest rank Permo-Carboniferous coals. An encouraging aspect of cooperative Sino-American efforts is the recent discovery of significant flows of methane from permeable anthracite reservoirs in Henan and Shanxi Provinces. These two discoveries are believed to be the first in the world from anthracites.« less