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Title: Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage

Abstract

This report is a summary of the environmental and regulatory issues associated with Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) technology. It reviews from an environmental perspective the progress and results of extensive engineering research and technology development directed at commercial development of CAES technology. A comprehensive analysis of the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES is also summarized. Significant conclusions are: the environmental impacts associated with construction and operation of CAES facilities are generally similar to or less severe than those associated with construction of conventional electrical generating facilities; adverse subsurface and surface environmental impacts can be largely avoided by thorough geological characterization of subsurface conditions, careful evaluation of surface environmental factors, and avoidance of unsuitable sites; the US has a large number of suitable sites; siting flexibility for CAES facilities is much greater than for other energy storage technologies; land use requirements are generally significantly less than for conventional generating facilities of similar genrating capacity; petroleum fuel use is much less than for conventional peak power generating facilities; CAES technology offers the potential for increased efficiency of utilization of utility system generating capacity which results in reduced overall resources commitment and reduced environmental impacts; and, due to lack ofmore » implementation experience, uncertainty still surrounds the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6390927
Report Number(s):
PNL-4460
ON: DE83009114
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LEGAL ASPECTS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; OFF-PEAK ENERGY STORAGE; ENERGY CONSERVATION; LAND USE; SITE SELECTION; ENERGY STORAGE; PUBLIC UTILITIES; STORAGE; 250200* - Energy Storage- Compressed & Liquified Gas; 290300 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety; 200107 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Off-Peak Energy Storage- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Not Available. Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.2172/6390927.
Not Available. Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage. United States. doi:10.2172/6390927.
Not Available. Tue . "Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage". United States. doi:10.2172/6390927. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6390927.
@article{osti_6390927,
title = {Review of environmental studies and issues on compressed-air energy storage},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {This report is a summary of the environmental and regulatory issues associated with Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) technology. It reviews from an environmental perspective the progress and results of extensive engineering research and technology development directed at commercial development of CAES technology. A comprehensive analysis of the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES is also summarized. Significant conclusions are: the environmental impacts associated with construction and operation of CAES facilities are generally similar to or less severe than those associated with construction of conventional electrical generating facilities; adverse subsurface and surface environmental impacts can be largely avoided by thorough geological characterization of subsurface conditions, careful evaluation of surface environmental factors, and avoidance of unsuitable sites; the US has a large number of suitable sites; siting flexibility for CAES facilities is much greater than for other energy storage technologies; land use requirements are generally significantly less than for conventional generating facilities of similar genrating capacity; petroleum fuel use is much less than for conventional peak power generating facilities; CAES technology offers the potential for increased efficiency of utilization of utility system generating capacity which results in reduced overall resources commitment and reduced environmental impacts; and, due to lack of implementation experience, uncertainty still surrounds the legal and regulatory issues associated with CAES.},
doi = {10.2172/6390927},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1983},
month = {3}
}