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Title: Possible origins of resistive tails and critical currents in high-temperature superconductors in a magnetic field

Abstract

The universal lack of a Lorentz-force dependence on dissipation for fields parallel to the CuO{sub 2} planes of the highly anisotropic high-temperature superconductor Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}} questions whether flux motion is the cause of this dissipation. We report measurements over a wide range of current densities, in the broadened resistive transitions, current-voltage characteristics {ital I}({ital V}), and critical current densities {ital J}{sub {ital c}}. We rule out the suggestion that this effect is caused by vortices in the CuO{sub 2} planes, due to a small misalignment of fields parallel to these planes: That model requires a significantly larger field component perpendicular to the planes than is reasonable, based on the measured alignment of the samples and crystal axes. Instead, we consider a Josephson-coupling model that is consistent with the broadened resistive transitions and the lack of Lorentz-force dependence. A detailed comparison of the predictions of these models is made: The Josephson-coupling model is consistent with the temperature dependences of the activation energy {ital U} and {ital J}{sub {ital c}}, and is better matched to the weak-field dependence of {ital J}{sub {ital c}}; while the flux-creep model fits the experimental result for {ital U}, but it predicts amore » much stronger temperature and field dependence of {ital J}{sub {ital c}} than is found. Possible origins of Josephson junctions in high-quality films and single crystals are discussed. For the data with the field parallel to the {ital c} axis, a conventional flux-flow explanation is also quite reasonable.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL
OSTI Identifier:
6390919
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review, B: Condensed Matter; (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42:10; Journal ID: ISSN 0163-1829
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BARIUM OXIDES; CRITICAL CURRENT; CALCIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; THALLIUM OXIDES; CURRENT DENSITY; ENERGY LOSSES; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; OHM LAW; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; BARIUM COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CHALCOGENIDES; COPPER COMPOUNDS; CURRENTS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; LOSSES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SUPERCONDUCTORS; THALLIUM COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; 656100* - Condensed Matter Physics- Superconductivity; 360204 - Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories- Physical Properties

Citation Formats

Kim, D H, Gray, K E, Kampwirth, R T, and McKay, D M. Possible origins of resistive tails and critical currents in high-temperature superconductors in a magnetic field. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.42.6249.
Kim, D H, Gray, K E, Kampwirth, R T, & McKay, D M. Possible origins of resistive tails and critical currents in high-temperature superconductors in a magnetic field. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.42.6249.
Kim, D H, Gray, K E, Kampwirth, R T, and McKay, D M. Mon . "Possible origins of resistive tails and critical currents in high-temperature superconductors in a magnetic field". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.42.6249.
@article{osti_6390919,
title = {Possible origins of resistive tails and critical currents in high-temperature superconductors in a magnetic field},
author = {Kim, D H and Gray, K E and Kampwirth, R T and McKay, D M},
abstractNote = {The universal lack of a Lorentz-force dependence on dissipation for fields parallel to the CuO{sub 2} planes of the highly anisotropic high-temperature superconductor Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}} questions whether flux motion is the cause of this dissipation. We report measurements over a wide range of current densities, in the broadened resistive transitions, current-voltage characteristics {ital I}({ital V}), and critical current densities {ital J}{sub {ital c}}. We rule out the suggestion that this effect is caused by vortices in the CuO{sub 2} planes, due to a small misalignment of fields parallel to these planes: That model requires a significantly larger field component perpendicular to the planes than is reasonable, based on the measured alignment of the samples and crystal axes. Instead, we consider a Josephson-coupling model that is consistent with the broadened resistive transitions and the lack of Lorentz-force dependence. A detailed comparison of the predictions of these models is made: The Josephson-coupling model is consistent with the temperature dependences of the activation energy {ital U} and {ital J}{sub {ital c}}, and is better matched to the weak-field dependence of {ital J}{sub {ital c}}; while the flux-creep model fits the experimental result for {ital U}, but it predicts a much stronger temperature and field dependence of {ital J}{sub {ital c}} than is found. Possible origins of Josephson junctions in high-quality films and single crystals are discussed. For the data with the field parallel to the {ital c} axis, a conventional flux-flow explanation is also quite reasonable.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.42.6249},
journal = {Physical Review, B: Condensed Matter; (USA)},
issn = {0163-1829},
number = ,
volume = 42:10,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {10}
}