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Title: Residential photovoltaic system designs

Abstract

A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington (USA). Lincoln Lab.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
6378104
Report Number(s):
DOE/ET/20279-123; CONF-810526-17
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76ET20279
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15. IEEE PV specialists conference, Orlando, FL, USA, 11 May 1981
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; INTERCONNECTED POWER SYSTEMS; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SUPPLIES; DESIGN; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; CONSTRUCTION; COST; PERFORMANCE TESTING; POWER CONDITIONING CIRCUITS; SOLAR CELL ARRAYS; BUILDINGS; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; ENERGY SYSTEMS; EQUIPMENT; POWER SUPPLIES; POWER SYSTEMS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; TESTING; 140600* - Solar Energy- Photovoltaic Power Systems

Citation Formats

Russell, M. C. Residential photovoltaic system designs. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Russell, M. C. Residential photovoltaic system designs. United States.
Russell, M. C. Thu . "Residential photovoltaic system designs". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6378104.
@article{osti_6378104,
title = {Residential photovoltaic system designs},
author = {Russell, M. C.},
abstractNote = {A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • Six detailed residential photovoltaic system designs are summarized. They are: (1) a photovoltaic system for an all-electric Southwest residence employing a direct mount array, (2) a photovoltaic/thermal side-by-side system for a Northeast residence, (3) a photovoltaic system with battery storage for the Southwest employing a standoff array, (4) a photovoltaic system for a passive house design for the Northeast, (5) a photovoltaic system for a Southeast residence employing an integral mount array, and (6) a photovoltaic system for a temperate climate with either a standoff or an integral mounted array. Besides a summary description of all the designs, a discussionmore » is provided of the initial system configuration review and selection and a summary is provided of several design tradeoffs. Design issues and concerns are also discussed. For each design, the house description, system description, system operation, photovoltaic array, photovoltaic modules, power conversion subsystem, photovoltaic interface with the utility and house service, array sizing, and design performance are summarized. (LEW)« less
  • The development of residential photovoltaic power systems as part of the United States Department of Energy photovoltaic program will begin in FY-80. Prototype residential systems for heating, cooling and electric power will be built and evaluated at regional Residential Experiment Stations (RES's). The first RES locations will be in the Northeast and Southwest. The most appropriate system designs for Northeast and Southwest residences have been identified in various studies. Photovoltaic collector systems will be fielded in both the Northeast and Southwest RES facilities. A utility-interactive direct current to alternating current power inverter will be used with no on-site electrical storage.more » Similar systems using either combined photovoltaic/thermal collectors or separate photovoltaic modules and solar thermal collectors will be fielded at the Northeast RES facility.« less
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  • The operating performance for a 2.5 kWp, gridconnected, residential, photovoltaic system in San Diego is described. Average monthly energy output was 308 kWh (dc) and 262 kWh (ac) for the 15 month period October 1982 to December 1983. The average array, system, and PCU efficiencies were 7.7%, 6.5% and 85%, respectively. The power output of the array was found to be linearly dependent on the incident solar radiation, while the operating voltage decreased with increasing array temperature. The system has operated continuously for two years without any significant problems. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed for the San Diego area,more » and a system cost of $12,000 or $4.90 per peak watt was found to be cost-effective for grid-connected residential systems, if tax credits are included.« less