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Title: Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons

Abstract

It has been suggested that Congress establish a permanent, full-time, independent national commission for radioactive waste management activities at DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex. DOE regulates certain aspects of its treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive waste by orders that are not promulgated by notice and comment'' or other procedures in the Administration Procedures Act. Because many agencies are not legally and technologically structured to handle their own cleanup problems, these activities might be conducted by one entity that can share information and staff among these agencies. There are rational arguments for both sides of this issue. Some of the advantages of such an organization include: focusing Congress's attention on an integrated federal facility cleanup instead of a fragmented, agency by agency approach, and an ability to prioritize cleanup decisions among agencies. Some significant obstacles include: reluctance by Congress and the executive branch to create any new bureaucracy at a time of budget deficits, and a loss of momentum from the progress already being made by the agencies. Given that more than $9 billion was proposed for FY 93 alone for federal facilities' cleanup programs and that decades will pass before all problems are addressed, it is appropriate to consider newmore » approaches to environmental cleanup. This paper begins the dialogue about new ways to improve decision-making and government spending.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (GAO, Washington, DC (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6367821
Report Number(s):
CONF-930523-
Journal ID: ISSN 0191-5398; CODEN: EPROD9; TRN: 93-019786
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Professional; (United States); Journal Volume: Supplement; Conference: 18. National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP) annual conference on current and future priorities for environmental management, Raleigh, NC (United States), 24-26 May 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; DECISION MAKING; US DOE; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES; COST; REMEDIAL ACTION; MANAGEMENT; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; 052000* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Management

Citation Formats

Raynes, D.B., and Boss, G.R. Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Raynes, D.B., & Boss, G.R. Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons. United States.
Raynes, D.B., and Boss, G.R. 1993. "Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6367821,
title = {Consolidating federal facility cleanup: Some pros and cons},
author = {Raynes, D.B. and Boss, G.R.},
abstractNote = {It has been suggested that Congress establish a permanent, full-time, independent national commission for radioactive waste management activities at DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex. DOE regulates certain aspects of its treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive waste by orders that are not promulgated by notice and comment'' or other procedures in the Administration Procedures Act. Because many agencies are not legally and technologically structured to handle their own cleanup problems, these activities might be conducted by one entity that can share information and staff among these agencies. There are rational arguments for both sides of this issue. Some of the advantages of such an organization include: focusing Congress's attention on an integrated federal facility cleanup instead of a fragmented, agency by agency approach, and an ability to prioritize cleanup decisions among agencies. Some significant obstacles include: reluctance by Congress and the executive branch to create any new bureaucracy at a time of budget deficits, and a loss of momentum from the progress already being made by the agencies. Given that more than $9 billion was proposed for FY 93 alone for federal facilities' cleanup programs and that decades will pass before all problems are addressed, it is appropriate to consider new approaches to environmental cleanup. This paper begins the dialogue about new ways to improve decision-making and government spending.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Professional; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = Supplement,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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