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Title: Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods

Abstract

Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
OSTI Identifier:
6353233
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States); Journal Volume: 236
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DISEASES; DIAGNOSIS; RECOMBINANT DNA; ACCURACY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; DATA; DNA; INFORMATION; NUCLEIC ACIDS; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; 550900* - Pathology

Citation Formats

Caskey, C.T.. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1126/science.3296189.
Caskey, C.T.. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods. United States. doi:10.1126/science.3296189.
Caskey, C.T.. Fri . "Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods". United States. doi:10.1126/science.3296189.
@article{osti_6353233,
title = {Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods},
author = {Caskey, C.T.},
abstractNote = {Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.},
doi = {10.1126/science.3296189},
journal = {Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 236,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 1987},
month = {Fri Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 1987}
}
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