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Title: Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors

Abstract

In the wake of the catastrophic failure of a low-pressure (LP) turbine disk at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Station in 1969, considerable research and development has been devoted to the problem of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in steam turbine rotors. Principle factors affecting the susceptibility of rotors to SCC have been identified as disk yield strength, applied stress level, and surface film/crevice chemistry. Microstructure and cleanliness of the steel have been found to have relatively little effect. Advances in steel making and forging over the last 20 years have provided manufacturers with additional design and material options to mitigate the problem. Increases in forging size capabilities of steel companies and the welded construction of rotors now permit designing with integral and partial integral rotors that use materials with lower yield strength (more SCC resistant) as well as eliminating the SCC problem in bores and keyways. However, a recent survey of US utilities has shown that SCC in the blade attachment legion of LP rotors is an increasing concern. This problem has led to development of repair and refurbishment methods for rim attachments, especially weld buildup of rims with corrosion-resistant alloys. Life prediction of rotors under SCC conditions currently involves estimatingmore » crack growth time from assumed defects to critical size. Factors that govern the location and time of crack initiation are not understood adequately. 50 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Structural Integrity Associates, San Jose, CA (United States)
  2. Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
634555
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Corrosion
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: PBD: Jul 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; STRESS CORROSION; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; STEELS; STEAM TURBINES; ROTORS; CRACKS; CRACK PROPAGATION; INSPECTION; SERVICE LIFE; REPAIR

Citation Formats

Rosario, D A, Wells, C H, Licina, G J, and Viswanathan, R. Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.5006/1.3284881.
Rosario, D A, Wells, C H, Licina, G J, & Viswanathan, R. Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors. United States. https://doi.org/10.5006/1.3284881
Rosario, D A, Wells, C H, Licina, G J, and Viswanathan, R. Wed . "Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors". United States. https://doi.org/10.5006/1.3284881.
@article{osti_634555,
title = {Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors},
author = {Rosario, D A and Wells, C H and Licina, G J and Viswanathan, R},
abstractNote = {In the wake of the catastrophic failure of a low-pressure (LP) turbine disk at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Station in 1969, considerable research and development has been devoted to the problem of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in steam turbine rotors. Principle factors affecting the susceptibility of rotors to SCC have been identified as disk yield strength, applied stress level, and surface film/crevice chemistry. Microstructure and cleanliness of the steel have been found to have relatively little effect. Advances in steel making and forging over the last 20 years have provided manufacturers with additional design and material options to mitigate the problem. Increases in forging size capabilities of steel companies and the welded construction of rotors now permit designing with integral and partial integral rotors that use materials with lower yield strength (more SCC resistant) as well as eliminating the SCC problem in bores and keyways. However, a recent survey of US utilities has shown that SCC in the blade attachment legion of LP rotors is an increasing concern. This problem has led to development of repair and refurbishment methods for rim attachments, especially weld buildup of rims with corrosion-resistant alloys. Life prediction of rotors under SCC conditions currently involves estimating crack growth time from assumed defects to critical size. Factors that govern the location and time of crack initiation are not understood adequately. 50 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.5006/1.3284881},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/634555}, journal = {Corrosion},
number = 7,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {7}
}