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Title: Proceedings of the workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations

Abstract

The workshop was held to discuss two topics: first, a performance standard for radiation survey instruments and the potential for a testing program based on that standard; and second, a system of secondary standards laboratories to provide instrument calibrations and related services. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual presentations. (ACR)

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6340343
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-13346; CONF-840774-
ON: DE86005525
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations, Gaithersburg, MD, USA, 10 Jul 1984; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; RADIATION MONITORS; CALIBRATION; MEETINGS; LEADING ABSTRACT; REGULATIONS; STANDARDS; ABSTRACTS; DOCUMENT TYPES; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MONITORS; 440101* - Radiation Instrumentation- General Detectors or Monitors & Radiometric Instruments

Citation Formats

Selby, J.M., Swinth, K.L., Vallario, E.J., and Murphy, B.L.. Proceedings of the workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Selby, J.M., Swinth, K.L., Vallario, E.J., & Murphy, B.L.. Proceedings of the workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations. United States.
Selby, J.M., Swinth, K.L., Vallario, E.J., and Murphy, B.L.. 1985. "Proceedings of the workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6340343,
title = {Proceedings of the workshop on radiation survey instruments and calibrations},
author = {Selby, J.M. and Swinth, K.L. and Vallario, E.J. and Murphy, B.L.},
abstractNote = {The workshop was held to discuss two topics: first, a performance standard for radiation survey instruments and the potential for a testing program based on that standard; and second, a system of secondary standards laboratories to provide instrument calibrations and related services. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual presentations. (ACR)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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