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Title: Secondary batteries for electrical energy storage. [Review]

Abstract

Batteries appear to be an ideal companion to coal- and nuclear-derived electrical energy to power vehicles and to play a key role in electrical generation and distribution networks. In certain instances batteries could augment solar-derived electrical energy to attain continuity and reliability of power. The battery systems now under development represent a broad range of possible approaches encompassing extremes of the periodic table, a wide variety of operating temperatures, and limitless design concepts. Along with the substantial international emphasis on battery development, this range of approaches suggests that one or more of the candidate systems can be demonstrated to have commercial viability for electric vehicle (EV) and utility (U) applications. Time frames in which this can occur are: (1) Near Term (before 1985) - Improved Lead-Acid (EV), Nickel-Zinc (EV), and Nickel-Iron (EV); (2) Intermediate Term (1985 to 1990) - Zinc-Chlorine (Utility application (U), EV), and Zinc-Bromine (U,EV); and (3) Long Term (after 1990) - Sodium-Sulfur (U,EV), Lithium-Iron Sulfide (EV), and Redox (U). Even when a potential for commercial viability has been demonstrated, actual implementation will be deterred by high capital cost, substantial commercialization costs, and buyer reluctance. Legislation and/or regulation can change the economics of utility-battery energy storage, and personalmore » inconvenience (rationing or waiting in gas lines) can override the economics of vehicle application. 46 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA
OSTI Identifier:
6336861
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Annu. Rev. Energy; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC BATTERIES; COMMERCIALIZATION; ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; PUBLIC UTILITIES; VEHICLES; 250900* - Energy Storage- Batteries; 290700 - Energy Planning & Policy- Transport & Storage

Citation Formats

Douglas, D L, and Birk, J R. Secondary batteries for electrical energy storage. [Review]. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.eg.05.110180.000425.
Douglas, D L, & Birk, J R. Secondary batteries for electrical energy storage. [Review]. United States. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.eg.05.110180.000425
Douglas, D L, and Birk, J R. 1980. "Secondary batteries for electrical energy storage. [Review]". United States. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.eg.05.110180.000425.
@article{osti_6336861,
title = {Secondary batteries for electrical energy storage. [Review]},
author = {Douglas, D L and Birk, J R},
abstractNote = {Batteries appear to be an ideal companion to coal- and nuclear-derived electrical energy to power vehicles and to play a key role in electrical generation and distribution networks. In certain instances batteries could augment solar-derived electrical energy to attain continuity and reliability of power. The battery systems now under development represent a broad range of possible approaches encompassing extremes of the periodic table, a wide variety of operating temperatures, and limitless design concepts. Along with the substantial international emphasis on battery development, this range of approaches suggests that one or more of the candidate systems can be demonstrated to have commercial viability for electric vehicle (EV) and utility (U) applications. Time frames in which this can occur are: (1) Near Term (before 1985) - Improved Lead-Acid (EV), Nickel-Zinc (EV), and Nickel-Iron (EV); (2) Intermediate Term (1985 to 1990) - Zinc-Chlorine (Utility application (U), EV), and Zinc-Bromine (U,EV); and (3) Long Term (after 1990) - Sodium-Sulfur (U,EV), Lithium-Iron Sulfide (EV), and Redox (U). Even when a potential for commercial viability has been demonstrated, actual implementation will be deterred by high capital cost, substantial commercialization costs, and buyer reluctance. Legislation and/or regulation can change the economics of utility-battery energy storage, and personal inconvenience (rationing or waiting in gas lines) can override the economics of vehicle application. 46 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.eg.05.110180.000425},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6336861}, journal = {Annu. Rev. Energy; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {1}
}