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Title: Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.

Abstract

All Idaho hatchery-reared steelhead released in the spring of 1985 received an adipose fin clip to differentiate between natural or wild and hatchery, fish, thus allowing for protection of wild fish in the sport harvest. Between 25 September and 14 December 1984, 6,360,542 steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) were marked by excising the adipose fin. A total of 10,336 man hours were required to complete the operation. Clip quality and healing, mortality, and adipose fin composition were determined. Quality checks indicated less than 1% of the fish had more than 25% of the fin remaining. Combined mortality at all three hatcheries was 0.3% of the total fish marked. Observed and in vivo test showed complete healing of the excision within 3-4 weeks (observed) and 22 days (in vivo). Bibliographies were compiled for fin regeneration, marked fish survival, hooking mortality, and related catch-and-release studies.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG)
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
6333028
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-14903-1
ON: DE87010556
DOE Contract Number:
AI79-84BP14903
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FISHERIES; MANAGEMENT; FISHES; POPULATION DYNAMICS; IDAHO; MORTALITY; SURVIVAL CURVES; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; FEDERAL REGION X; NORTH AMERICA; USA; VERTEBRATES; Steelhead (Fish) - Idaho; 520500* - Environment, Aquatic- Site Resource & Use Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Duke, Rodney C. Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.2172/6333028.
Duke, Rodney C. Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/6333028.
Duke, Rodney C. 1986. "Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/6333028. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6333028.
@article{osti_6333028,
title = {Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1984-1985 Annual Report.},
author = {Duke, Rodney C.},
abstractNote = {All Idaho hatchery-reared steelhead released in the spring of 1985 received an adipose fin clip to differentiate between natural or wild and hatchery, fish, thus allowing for protection of wild fish in the sport harvest. Between 25 September and 14 December 1984, 6,360,542 steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) were marked by excising the adipose fin. A total of 10,336 man hours were required to complete the operation. Clip quality and healing, mortality, and adipose fin composition were determined. Quality checks indicated less than 1% of the fish had more than 25% of the fin remaining. Combined mortality at all three hatcheries was 0.3% of the total fish marked. Observed and in vivo test showed complete healing of the excision within 3-4 weeks (observed) and 22 days (in vivo). Bibliographies were compiled for fin regeneration, marked fish survival, hooking mortality, and related catch-and-release studies.},
doi = {10.2172/6333028},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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  • Steelhead trout reared in Idaho hatcheries for release during the 1984--1988 outmigrations were adipose fin clipped to differentiate between wild/natural and hatchery-reared fish. From 1984--1988, 34 million hatchery-reared steelhead trout were clipped and 30.1 million were released; the difference being made up by hatchery mortality and the percent of acceptable clips. Since 1987, the adipose clip has given protection to all wild/natural steelhead and identified them from hatchery stocks. 135 refs.
  • During the fall of 1984 and spring of 1985, 362,428 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) juveniles were freeze branded for Water Budget Center - Downstream Smolt Monitoring Studies. Of these, 106,361 fish received a coded wire tag. Release of the freeze brand groups began March 20, 1985 and were completed by June 4, 1985. After brand loss and mortality, there were 133,025 spring chinook, 25,600 summer chinook, 33,850 fall chinook, 65,125 A-run steelhead, and 62,400 B-run steelhead released with brands.
  • Fish were collected from 60 stocks of chinook salmon and 62 stocks of steelhead trout. Electrophoretic analyses were completed on 43 stocks of chinook salmon and 41 stocks of steelhead trout and meristic counts were completed on 43 stocks of chinook and 41 stocks of steelhead. Statistical comparisons between year classes of our electrophoretic data indicate that most enzyme systems are stable over time but some may be dynamic and should be used with caution in our analyses. We also compared neighboring stocks of both spring chinook and steelhead trout. These comparisons were between stocks of the same race frommore » adjacent stream systems and/or hatcheries. Differences in isozyme gene frequencies can be used to estimate genetic segregation between pairs of stocks. Analysis of the chinook data suggests that, as expected, the number of statistically significant differences in isozyme gene frequencies increases as the geographic distance between stocks increases. The results from comparisons between adjacent steelhead stocks were inconclusive and must await final analysis with more data. Cluster analyses using either isozyme gene frequencies or meristic characters both tended to group the chinook and steelhead stocks by geographic areas and by race and both methods resulted in generally similar grouping patterns. However, cluster analyses using isozyme gene frequencies produced more clusters than the analyses using meristic characters probably because of the greater number of electrophoretic characters compared to the number of meristic characters. Heterozygosity values for each stock were computed using the isozyme gene frequencies. The highest heterozygosity values for chinook were observed in summer chinook and the hatchery stocks while the lowest values were observed in the spring chinook and wild stocks. The results of comparisons of heterozygosity values among areas were inconclusive. The steelhead heterozygosity values were higher in the winter stocks than in the summer stocks and similar between hatchery and wild stocks. Heterozygosity values among the areas were very similar for the steelhead stocks. Analysis of variance tests indicate that significant differences exist among the stocks for scales in the lateral series, scale rows above the lateral line, anal rays, dorsal rays, vertebrae and paired fin rays for both steelhead and chinook. Tests on gill raker and branchiostegal counts will be conducted when those counts are completed. Morphometric characters were compared between fed and starved groups of steelhead trout to determine which characters may be affected by condition factor or fatness of the fish. The results show that the linear characters, some head measurements and the truss-type characters in the caudal peduncle are most likely to be unaffected by condition factor. The measurements in the gut area of the fish appear to be unsuitable for discriminating among the stocks since they are highly affected by condition factor.« less
  • The progress of the project objectives are given in this report. The project objectives are: (1) enhancement of the natural spawning summer steelhead run in the Umatilla River Drainage; (2) establishment of a hatchery produced summer steelhead run in the Umatilla River; (3) protect the Confederated Tribes right to fish as reserved by the Treat of 1855 with the US Government; (4) enhance Indian and non-Indian fishing opportunities within the Umatilla River System; (5) demonstration of low-tech, low-cost acclimation facilities in conjunction with off-site hatchery production for rehabilitation of anadromous salmonid populations; and (6) partial mitigation for the impact ofmore » federal hydroelectric projects on the Umatilla River fisheries.« less
  • Mainstream projects which have adult fish passage facilities are inspected by project operators, fishway attendants, and state and federal fishery agencies. The overall movement of upstream migrants in 1984 appeared to be satisfactory with few delays. Special efforts were made by fishery agencies and Corps personnel to check on potential problems which appeared to exist at The Dalles and John Day Dams this year. However, adult passage facilities were operating ''in criteria'' and fish may have been delayed by temperature or other factors. Inspections were generally made once a month. Some projects were operating at less than full criteria asmore » seen during inspections by fishery agencies this year. It appears that during periods of low tailwater, certain projects have difficulty maintaining proper head at main fishway entrances. Some main entrance gates bottom-out and water depth over these weirs are not up to desired criteria. Also it was noted that auxiliary water pumps were not being run at a rate to achieve the desired amount of water for attracting fish to the fish ladders and maintaining proper head at main fishway entrances.« less