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Title: Assessment of the possible future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increases based on a coupled one-dimensional atmospheric-oceanic model

Abstract

A radiative-convective equilibrium model of the atmosphere has been coupled with a mixed layer model of the ocean to investigate the response of this one-dimensional system to increasing carbon dioxide amounts in the atmosphere. For global mean conditions a surface temperature rise of about 2/sup 0/ K was obtained for a doubling of the carbon dioxide amount, in reasonable agreement with the commonly accepted results of Manabe and Wetherald. This temperature rise was essentially invariant with season and indicates that including a shallow (300 m) ocean slab in this problem does not basically alter previous assessments. While the mixed layer depth of the ocean was only very slightly changed by the temperature increase, which extended throughout the depth of the mixed layer, the impact of this increase on the overall behavior of the ocean warrants further study. A calculation was also made of the temporal variation of the sea surface temperature for three possible carbon dioxide growth rates starting from an initial carbon dioxide content of 300 ppm. This indicated that the thermal inertia of the slab ocean provides a time lag of 8 years in the sea surface temperature response compared to a land situation. This is not consideredmore » to be of great significance as regards the likely future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increase.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Australian Numerical Meterorology Research Centre, P. O. Box 5089AA, Melbourne, Australia 3001
OSTI Identifier:
6329305
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 84:C2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CLIMATES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; CARBON DIOXIDE; HEAT TRANSFER; ISOLATED VALUES; SEAS; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; THEORETICAL DATA; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; DATA; DATA FORMS; ENERGY TRANSFER; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SURFACE WATERS; 500100* - Environment, Atmospheric- Basic Studies- (-1989); 640200 - Atmospheric Physics

Citation Formats

Hunt, B G, and Wells, N C. Assessment of the possible future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increases based on a coupled one-dimensional atmospheric-oceanic model. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.1029/JC084iC02p00787.
Hunt, B G, & Wells, N C. Assessment of the possible future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increases based on a coupled one-dimensional atmospheric-oceanic model. United States. doi:10.1029/JC084iC02p00787.
Hunt, B G, and Wells, N C. Tue . "Assessment of the possible future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increases based on a coupled one-dimensional atmospheric-oceanic model". United States. doi:10.1029/JC084iC02p00787.
@article{osti_6329305,
title = {Assessment of the possible future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increases based on a coupled one-dimensional atmospheric-oceanic model},
author = {Hunt, B G and Wells, N C},
abstractNote = {A radiative-convective equilibrium model of the atmosphere has been coupled with a mixed layer model of the ocean to investigate the response of this one-dimensional system to increasing carbon dioxide amounts in the atmosphere. For global mean conditions a surface temperature rise of about 2/sup 0/ K was obtained for a doubling of the carbon dioxide amount, in reasonable agreement with the commonly accepted results of Manabe and Wetherald. This temperature rise was essentially invariant with season and indicates that including a shallow (300 m) ocean slab in this problem does not basically alter previous assessments. While the mixed layer depth of the ocean was only very slightly changed by the temperature increase, which extended throughout the depth of the mixed layer, the impact of this increase on the overall behavior of the ocean warrants further study. A calculation was also made of the temporal variation of the sea surface temperature for three possible carbon dioxide growth rates starting from an initial carbon dioxide content of 300 ppm. This indicated that the thermal inertia of the slab ocean provides a time lag of 8 years in the sea surface temperature response compared to a land situation. This is not considered to be of great significance as regards the likely future climatic impact of carbon dioxide increase.},
doi = {10.1029/JC084iC02p00787},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 84:C2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}