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Title: Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis

Abstract

Four patients developed neutropenic colitis as a complication of acute leukemia (three) or aplastic anemia (one). On computed tomography (CT), neutropenic colitis was characterized by cecal wall thickening (four) and pneumatosis (one). Intramural areas of lower density presumably reflected edema or hemorrhage. Clinical improvement and return of adequate numbers of functioning neutrophils coincided with decrease in cecal wall thickening on CT. Prompt radiologic recognition of this serious condition is crucial, since surgical intervention is probably best avoided.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Minnesota Hospitals, Minneapolis
OSTI Identifier:
6304010
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AJR, Am. J. Roentgenol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 143:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ABDOMEN; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; DIAGNOSIS; ANEMIAS; LEUKEMIA; NEUTROPHILS; PATIENTS; SMALL INTESTINE; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY; BODY AREAS; BODY FLUIDS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; HEMIC DISEASES; INTESTINES; LEUKOCYTES; MATERIALS; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; SYMPTOMS; TOMOGRAPHY; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-); 550900 - Pathology

Citation Formats

Frick, M.P., Maile, C.W., Crass, J.R., Goldberg, M.E., and Delaney, J.P. Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2214/ajr.143.4.763.
Frick, M.P., Maile, C.W., Crass, J.R., Goldberg, M.E., & Delaney, J.P. Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis. United States. doi:10.2214/ajr.143.4.763.
Frick, M.P., Maile, C.W., Crass, J.R., Goldberg, M.E., and Delaney, J.P. Mon . "Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis". United States. doi:10.2214/ajr.143.4.763.
@article{osti_6304010,
title = {Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis},
author = {Frick, M.P. and Maile, C.W. and Crass, J.R. and Goldberg, M.E. and Delaney, J.P.},
abstractNote = {Four patients developed neutropenic colitis as a complication of acute leukemia (three) or aplastic anemia (one). On computed tomography (CT), neutropenic colitis was characterized by cecal wall thickening (four) and pneumatosis (one). Intramural areas of lower density presumably reflected edema or hemorrhage. Clinical improvement and return of adequate numbers of functioning neutrophils coincided with decrease in cecal wall thickening on CT. Prompt radiologic recognition of this serious condition is crucial, since surgical intervention is probably best avoided.},
doi = {10.2214/ajr.143.4.763},
journal = {AJR, Am. J. Roentgenol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 143:4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984},
month = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1984}
}
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