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Title: Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings

Abstract

This paper concentrates on laser coating of Fe-22 wt% Cr and a duplex steel SAF2205 by injecting Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder into the melt pool. In particular the work focuses on the stabilization of high temperature distorted spinel phases due to the high quench rates involved as well as on the a quantitative crystallographic analysis of the resulting morphologies. The microstructure observed in TEM indicates that the material does not solidify in the distorted spinel structure. The presence of a small amount of cubic (Fe, Cr)-spinel suggests that the distorted spinel in fact might be nucleated from the cubic spinel phase. The plate like morphology of the distorted spinel phase in combination with the twinned internal structure of the plates put forward the idea that the transformation might be martensitic. Martensitic calculations executed with the lattice parameters of the cubic and distorted (Fe, Cr)-spinel phases are in excellent agreement with the experimental data confirming that the transformation might be martensitic indeed.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6301661
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Metallurgica et Materialia; (United States); Journal Volume: 41:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHROMIUM OXIDES; CRYSTAL-PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; STEELS; PROTECTIVE COATINGS; CERAMICS; DEPOSITION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; IRON OXIDES; MICROSTRUCTURE; MORPHOLOGY; PHASE DIAGRAMS; PHASE STUDIES; SPINELS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; ALLOYS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS; COATINGS; COHERENT SCATTERING; DATA; DIAGRAMS; DIFFRACTION; INFORMATION; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; IRON COMPOUNDS; MINERALS; NUMERICAL DATA; OXIDE MINERALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SCATTERING; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; 360202* - Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories- Structure & Phase Studies

Citation Formats

Burg, M. van den, and De Hosson, J.T.M. Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1016/0956-7151(93)90125-C.
Burg, M. van den, & De Hosson, J.T.M. Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings. United States. doi:10.1016/0956-7151(93)90125-C.
Burg, M. van den, and De Hosson, J.T.M. Wed . "Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings". United States. doi:10.1016/0956-7151(93)90125-C.
@article{osti_6301661,
title = {Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings},
author = {Burg, M. van den and De Hosson, J.T.M.},
abstractNote = {This paper concentrates on laser coating of Fe-22 wt% Cr and a duplex steel SAF2205 by injecting Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder into the melt pool. In particular the work focuses on the stabilization of high temperature distorted spinel phases due to the high quench rates involved as well as on the a quantitative crystallographic analysis of the resulting morphologies. The microstructure observed in TEM indicates that the material does not solidify in the distorted spinel structure. The presence of a small amount of cubic (Fe, Cr)-spinel suggests that the distorted spinel in fact might be nucleated from the cubic spinel phase. The plate like morphology of the distorted spinel phase in combination with the twinned internal structure of the plates put forward the idea that the transformation might be martensitic. Martensitic calculations executed with the lattice parameters of the cubic and distorted (Fe, Cr)-spinel phases are in excellent agreement with the experimental data confirming that the transformation might be martensitic indeed.},
doi = {10.1016/0956-7151(93)90125-C},
journal = {Acta Metallurgica et Materialia; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 41:9,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993},
month = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1993}
}
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