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Title: Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

Abstract

Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22%more » of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
629327
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CP-94479; CONF-971150-
ON: DE98000321; BR: EC01; TRN: AD-a340 706
DOE Contract Number:
AI05-95OR22462
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Energy Efficient Building Association conference: excellence in building, Denver, CO (United States), 6-8 Nov 1997; Other Information: PBD: 25 Sep 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; WALLS; COVERINGS; STANDARD OF LIVING; HOUSES; APARTMENT BUILDINGS; BUILDING MATERIALS; THERMAL INSULATION; PUBLIC HEALTH; COMPOSITE MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Wendt, Robert L., and Cavallo, James. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Wendt, Robert L., & Cavallo, James. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls. United States.
Wendt, Robert L., and Cavallo, James. 1997. "Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/629327.
@article{osti_629327,
title = {Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls},
author = {Wendt, Robert L. and Cavallo, James},
abstractNote = {Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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