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Title: Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

Abstract

The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Cambridge (England))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6276013
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physiology (1985); (USA); Journal Volume: 69:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MAMMALS; BODY COMPOSITION; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; DEUTERIUM; FAT CELLS; ISOTOPE DILUTION; METABOLISM; PROTEINS; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SOMATIC CELLS; STABLE ISOTOPES; TRACER TECHNIQUES; VERTEBRATES; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Reilly, J.J., and Fedak, M.A. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Reilly, J.J., & Fedak, M.A. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution. United States.
Reilly, J.J., and Fedak, M.A. Sat . "Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6276013,
title = {Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution},
author = {Reilly, J.J. and Fedak, M.A.},
abstractNote = {The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physiology (1985); (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 69:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990},
month = {Sat Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990}
}
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