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Title: Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-349-2022, Rockcastle Manufacturing, Mount Vernon, Kentucky

Abstract

In response to a request from an authorized employee representative, an investigation was made of possible exposures to hazardous substances at the Rockcastle Manufacturing Company, Mount Vernon, Kentucky. Employees had complained of headaches, burning eyes, nausea, vomiting, fainting, and adverse reproductive effects. The facility fabricated men's uniform work pants. There were about 190 production workers, most of whom operated sewing machines. Other workers operated presses, ovens, or worked as cutters, spreaders, glue sprayers, bundlers, and maintenance workers. Formaldehyde air sampling ranged from 0.14 parts per million (ppm) to 0.46ppm in five personal breathing zone samples and from 0.32ppm to 0.70ppm in 13 area air samples. Formaldehyde release from eight fabric samples ranged from 163 to 1430 micrograms of formaldehyde per gram of fabric (microg/g). Organic vapor air samples were collected and only 1,1,1-trichloroethane was detected, with all values being below 0.3ppm. Total particulate concentrations ranged from 0.17 to 2.12mg/cu m. Questionnaire survey results indicated an elevated rate of birth defects, stillbirths, and premature births in women employed at the site while pregnant. The authors conclude that workers were exposed to low levels of formaldehyde, compatible with reported symptoms of eye, respiratory, skin irritation, and headache. The authors recommend that specificmore » measures be taken to further reduce exposures. Potential ergonomic hazards and future reproductive outcomes of employees should be evaluated.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6275752
Report Number(s):
PB-91-107946/XAB; HETA--87-349-2022
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; FORMALDEHYDE; HEALTH HAZARDS; KENTUCKY; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE EXPOSURE; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PERSONNEL; PREGNANCY; RECOMMENDATIONS; SYMPTOMS; TEXTILE INDUSTRY; AIR POLLUTION; ALDEHYDES; FEDERAL REGION IV; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; HAZARDS; INDUSTRY; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; SAFETY STANDARDS; STANDARDS; USA 540120* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Seitz, T., and Baron, S. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-349-2022, Rockcastle Manufacturing, Mount Vernon, Kentucky. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Seitz, T., & Baron, S. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-349-2022, Rockcastle Manufacturing, Mount Vernon, Kentucky. United States.
Seitz, T., and Baron, S. 1990. "Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-349-2022, Rockcastle Manufacturing, Mount Vernon, Kentucky". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6275752,
title = {Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-349-2022, Rockcastle Manufacturing, Mount Vernon, Kentucky},
author = {Seitz, T. and Baron, S.},
abstractNote = {In response to a request from an authorized employee representative, an investigation was made of possible exposures to hazardous substances at the Rockcastle Manufacturing Company, Mount Vernon, Kentucky. Employees had complained of headaches, burning eyes, nausea, vomiting, fainting, and adverse reproductive effects. The facility fabricated men's uniform work pants. There were about 190 production workers, most of whom operated sewing machines. Other workers operated presses, ovens, or worked as cutters, spreaders, glue sprayers, bundlers, and maintenance workers. Formaldehyde air sampling ranged from 0.14 parts per million (ppm) to 0.46ppm in five personal breathing zone samples and from 0.32ppm to 0.70ppm in 13 area air samples. Formaldehyde release from eight fabric samples ranged from 163 to 1430 micrograms of formaldehyde per gram of fabric (microg/g). Organic vapor air samples were collected and only 1,1,1-trichloroethane was detected, with all values being below 0.3ppm. Total particulate concentrations ranged from 0.17 to 2.12mg/cu m. Questionnaire survey results indicated an elevated rate of birth defects, stillbirths, and premature births in women employed at the site while pregnant. The authors conclude that workers were exposed to low levels of formaldehyde, compatible with reported symptoms of eye, respiratory, skin irritation, and headache. The authors recommend that specific measures be taken to further reduce exposures. Potential ergonomic hazards and future reproductive outcomes of employees should be evaluated.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:
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