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Title: Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes

Abstract

The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6275070
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Physics; (USA); Journal Volume: 59:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FALLOUT; DEPOSITION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; METEOROLOGY; NEVADA TEST SITE; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; EXPLOSIONS; MASS TRANSFER; MONITORING; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US DOE; US ORGANIZATIONS; 540130* - Environment, Atmospheric- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Quinn, V.E.. Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1097/00004032-199011000-00009.
Quinn, V.E.. Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes. United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199011000-00009.
Quinn, V.E.. 1990. "Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes". United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199011000-00009.
@article{osti_6275070,
title = {Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes},
author = {Quinn, V.E.},
abstractNote = {The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.},
doi = {10.1097/00004032-199011000-00009},
journal = {Health Physics; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 59:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}
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