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Title: Impacts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act on the siting of coal-conversion energy facilities in the United States

Abstract

It is likely that the cost of waste storage will be more expensive at sandy sites than at sites over clay soils. Facilities holding wastes that are sited at sandy locations are likely to have serious leachate contamination problems forcing the developer to take special precautions or use expensive pond liners, such as membranes. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) may add to the attractiveness of using low-ash coals because the amount of wastes generated depends critically on the amount of noncombustible material in the coal. Because the largest deposits of low-ash coal occur in the West, it is possible that RCRA may increase the attractiveness of western sites over eastern ones. RCRA will probably decrease the attractiveness of urban locations for new energy facilities. Hazardous waste regulations explicitly preclude facilities from being sited in congested areas. Utilization of the recovered material produced in the largest volumes (ash and sulfur) will require imagination and new applications). Most facilities producing the largest volumes of heavy, inexpensive substances are to be located far from the traditional markets and off barge-scale, navigable rivers. Long-distance overland hauls of ash and sulfur are infeasible. Ways must be developed to use such materials near wheremore » they are being produced. Markets for fly and bottom ash can be widespread if thesubstance is publicly accepted. Ash has been demonstrated to be a quality road-building aggregate. Markets for sulfur are more regionally concentrated than those for ash. Sulfuric acid production facilities are the largest consumers of sulfur in the nation. Most of these facilities are located on the Gulf Coast, in California and Illinois. 53 references.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6271723
Report Number(s):
ORNL/OEPA-12
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL GASIFICATION PLANTS; SITE SELECTION; COAL LIQUEFACTION PLANTS; FLY ASH; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; RESOURCE RECOVERY ACTS; WASTE DISPOSAL; COAL; DECISION MAKING; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LAWS; MARKET; REGULATIONS; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; USA; WASTE MANAGEMENT; AEROSOL WASTES; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WASTES; 294001* - Energy Planning & Policy- Coal; 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects; 017000 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Legislation & Regulations; 200203 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Waste Management- Site Selection & Land Use; 290400 - Energy Planning & Policy- Energy Resources

Citation Formats

Calzonetti, F.J. Impacts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act on the siting of coal-conversion energy facilities in the United States. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Calzonetti, F.J. Impacts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act on the siting of coal-conversion energy facilities in the United States. United States.
Calzonetti, F.J. Thu . "Impacts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act on the siting of coal-conversion energy facilities in the United States". United States.
@article{osti_6271723,
title = {Impacts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act on the siting of coal-conversion energy facilities in the United States},
author = {Calzonetti, F.J.},
abstractNote = {It is likely that the cost of waste storage will be more expensive at sandy sites than at sites over clay soils. Facilities holding wastes that are sited at sandy locations are likely to have serious leachate contamination problems forcing the developer to take special precautions or use expensive pond liners, such as membranes. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) may add to the attractiveness of using low-ash coals because the amount of wastes generated depends critically on the amount of noncombustible material in the coal. Because the largest deposits of low-ash coal occur in the West, it is possible that RCRA may increase the attractiveness of western sites over eastern ones. RCRA will probably decrease the attractiveness of urban locations for new energy facilities. Hazardous waste regulations explicitly preclude facilities from being sited in congested areas. Utilization of the recovered material produced in the largest volumes (ash and sulfur) will require imagination and new applications). Most facilities producing the largest volumes of heavy, inexpensive substances are to be located far from the traditional markets and off barge-scale, navigable rivers. Long-distance overland hauls of ash and sulfur are infeasible. Ways must be developed to use such materials near where they are being produced. Markets for fly and bottom ash can be widespread if thesubstance is publicly accepted. Ash has been demonstrated to be a quality road-building aggregate. Markets for sulfur are more regionally concentrated than those for ash. Sulfuric acid production facilities are the largest consumers of sulfur in the nation. Most of these facilities are located on the Gulf Coast, in California and Illinois. 53 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}

Technical Report:
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