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Title: Assumptions and approaches to developing building retrofit survey guidelines and evaluation criteria

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to review and assess existing Federal Government Building Standards, retrofit implementation plans and develop uniform and consistent buildings survey guidelines and criteria for use by all Federal agencies in the conduct of their buildings survey actions in support of the Federal Energy Management Program. The contractor will also develop survey evaluation techniques and methodology to be utilized by the Federal Energy Administration in the evaluation of Federal agency survey results and prioritization and selection of optimum sets of buildings retrofit projects. The study assumptions and criteria involved in designing a document to aid Federal agencies in identifying energy conserving building retrofit programs are itemized and discussed. (LCL)

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
JRB Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6265586
Report Number(s):
DOE/TIC-10602
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FEDERAL BUILDINGS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; RETROFITTING; EVALUATION; PLANNING; RECOMMENDATIONS; STANDARDS; BUILDINGS 320103* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- School, Municipal, & Other Public Buildings-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Not Available. Assumptions and approaches to developing building retrofit survey guidelines and evaluation criteria. United States: N. p., 1976. Web.
Not Available. Assumptions and approaches to developing building retrofit survey guidelines and evaluation criteria. United States.
Not Available. 1976. "Assumptions and approaches to developing building retrofit survey guidelines and evaluation criteria". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6265586,
title = {Assumptions and approaches to developing building retrofit survey guidelines and evaluation criteria},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this project was to review and assess existing Federal Government Building Standards, retrofit implementation plans and develop uniform and consistent buildings survey guidelines and criteria for use by all Federal agencies in the conduct of their buildings survey actions in support of the Federal Energy Management Program. The contractor will also develop survey evaluation techniques and methodology to be utilized by the Federal Energy Administration in the evaluation of Federal agency survey results and prioritization and selection of optimum sets of buildings retrofit projects. The study assumptions and criteria involved in designing a document to aid Federal agencies in identifying energy conserving building retrofit programs are itemized and discussed. (LCL)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1976,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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