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Title: Development of a long-life, stand-alone residential gas water heater. Final report, March 1985-August 1988

Abstract

The objective of the project was to develop a residential gas water heater that offers improved features and utility, including higher overall efficiency, long-life and stand-alone control, i.e., an ignition and control system requiring no electrical connection for operation. A prototype water heater was developed and tested in the laboratory. Recovery efficiency, standby loss and the resulting service efficiency were close to targets. A 15 year tank life and low voltage, soft-wired control with intermittent ignition were also shown to be feasible. However, commercialization was not achieved for several reasons, including high projected price, unverified life and reliability of the TPTS heat exchanger production design and the withdrawal from the project by the manufacturing partner.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6262904
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6262904
Report Number(s):
PB-91-240622/XAB; ADL-REF--54386
CNN: GRI-5084-241-1127
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Sponsored by Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; WATER HEATERS; DESIGN; CONTROL SYSTEMS; ECONOMICS; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY CONSERVATION; GAS APPLIANCES; IGNITION; NATURAL GAS; OPTIMIZATION; PERFORMANCE TESTING; RELIABILITY; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; SERVICE LIFE; APPLIANCES; BUILDINGS; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; HEATERS; TESTING 320106* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Equipment-- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Topping, R.F. Development of a long-life, stand-alone residential gas water heater. Final report, March 1985-August 1988. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Topping, R.F. Development of a long-life, stand-alone residential gas water heater. Final report, March 1985-August 1988. United States.
Topping, R.F. Sat . "Development of a long-life, stand-alone residential gas water heater. Final report, March 1985-August 1988". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6262904,
title = {Development of a long-life, stand-alone residential gas water heater. Final report, March 1985-August 1988},
author = {Topping, R.F.},
abstractNote = {The objective of the project was to develop a residential gas water heater that offers improved features and utility, including higher overall efficiency, long-life and stand-alone control, i.e., an ignition and control system requiring no electrical connection for operation. A prototype water heater was developed and tested in the laboratory. Recovery efficiency, standby loss and the resulting service efficiency were close to targets. A 15 year tank life and low voltage, soft-wired control with intermittent ignition were also shown to be feasible. However, commercialization was not achieved for several reasons, including high projected price, unverified life and reliability of the TPTS heat exchanger production design and the withdrawal from the project by the manufacturing partner.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1988},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1988}
}

Technical Report:
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