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Title: Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia State Univ., Atlanta (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6254149
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6254149
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; LENSES; PERMEABILITY; PSEUDOMONAS; ADHESION; EYES; GLASS; OPHTHALMOLOGY; POLYSTYRENE; RADIOISOTOPES; SENSE ORGANS DISEASES; TRACER TECHNIQUES; BACTERIA; BODY; BODY AREAS; DISEASES; FACE; HEAD; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; ORGANS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLASTICS; POLYMERS; POLYOLEFINS; POLYVINYLS; SENSE ORGANS; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS 550901* -- Pathology-- Tracer Techniques; 550600 -- Medicine

Citation Formats

Miller, M.J. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Miller, M.J. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses. United States.
Miller, M.J. Fri . "Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6254149,
title = {Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses},
author = {Miller, M.J.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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